Here are some of your e-mails in response to last week's column on equality initiatives in the workplace:

Dear Megan,

The way for women and minorities to get ahead in business is to work hard, do a good job and climb the ladder of success and quit relying on "diversity" teams, initiatives and committees to push them into work they are not qualified for and which discriminate against more competent and experienced white men. Thank you.

Douglas
Pleasanton, CA

Dear Megan,

I worked for a company that treated people differently. It must have been a wonderful existence for the 10 percent who got the vacations when they wanted, got all the time off they wanted, got the work hours and the assignments they wanted. It wasn't much fun for the rest of us. I cannot begin to tell you the feeling you develop. It's horrible.

You can treat people differently if you want to, but I can tell you right up front that your company will pay dearly for it. The 10 percent that you are treating differently will just become more and more demanding, to the point of absurdity.

Lynn

Dear Megan,

Fair treatment is not an option, and certain people should not be treated differently in the workplace.

There just should be nothing else to add to that.

Steven

Dear Megan,

Anyone who thinks every one is the same is a moron. We are all born...after that we make our own choices. School, sports, drugs...whatever. Anyone who is an employer needs to get the job done and that is the bottom line.

If employees do what they are paid to do and do not [whine] and moan about fair, the job gets done and everyone makes money. If you are worried about fair, become a Democrat and join a union.

Anonymous

Do you think it's important to recognize the differences in employees, and treat them accordingly? E-mail herbusiness@foxnews.com.

"Minding Her Business" is a column that covers issues affecting women in business and in the workplace. Female professionals (and male, too, if they wish) can use this resource to network, ask questions, receive and offer advice, share personal experiences … and you don’t ever have to leave your office. Just e-mail herbusiness@foxnews.com. E-mails are subject to editing for length and content.