Sunny Lee has some really supportive parents.

The 20-something gal has made a name for herself as the "Shirley Temple of Porn," thanks in large part to the help of her loving parents, ABC News reports.

Lee (not her real name) still lives at home with her parents, Mike and Shelby, who help her in every aspect of the business — from helping her create a doppelganger sex doll to bagging her dirty underwear for sale online.

"We're not kinky parents," Mike insists to ABC News.

They don't mind what she does, though they do fast-forward through her sex scenes with actors they refer to as "dates."

"She does her thing, safely, in a good environment, and I don't worry about that," Mike said. "When she comes back home, I just ask her how her date was."

They liken their role to that of Joe Simpson, the father-manager of singer Jessica Simpson.

"They do not make money off of me," Lee said. "If anything, I pay them. I pay them in return for everything — that they have loved and supported me after all these years."

This Unicorn Turns Out to Be Mythical After All

On Thursday, Out There reported on the case of Montana driver Phillip C. Holliday Jr., who blamed a unicorn for crashing his truck into a lamppost.

Well, it turns out that it wasn't a mythical one-horned beast behind the wheel after all.

County Attorney Dennis Paxinos told the Missoulian newspaper Wednesday that the prosecutor misunderstood an e-mail which referred to Holliday's "unicorn defense."

Prosecutors use the term to describe defendants who blame a mythical person for the crime, Paxinos told the paper.

“Mr. Holliday has other serious problems, but this is not one of them,” Paxinos said.

In actuality, Holliday told police that an unnamed woman was driving his truck when it crashed earlier this month. He has five drunken-driving convictions, according to the paper.

The legend of the Montana unicorn, while fanciful, remains just that, a myth.

“It’s a great story," Paxinos said. "It just isn’t correct.”

C-3P0 Where Are You?

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thirty years ago, in theaters near and far, far away, a movie opened the imaginations of millions, combining the magic of mythology and special effects to launch the "Star Wars" phenomenon.

A star of those films — the brave little robot R2-D2 — is about to take a turn collecting mail as the Postal Service and Lucasfilm Ltd. commemorate that movie launch.

The post office is wrapping mail collection boxes in some 200 cities nationwide in a special covering to look like R2-D2.

It's part of a promotion for a new stamp to be announced March 28, Anita T. Bizzotto, the post office's chief marketing officer, said.

"It's a little teaser for the upcoming announcement and we decided to have a little fun with it," she said.

About 400 mailboxes will be covered to look like the stout droid. "When you look at a mailbox, the resemblance to R2-D2 is too good to pass up," Bizzotto said.

While postal officials would like people to look for these mailboxes and maybe even drop in a letter, Bizzotto urged people not to tamper with them, noting that's a crime.

The Buds Came Early in Virginia This Year

HAMPTON, Va. (AP) — A man who tried to hide a small bag of marijuana just outside a courthouse door — a common trick used for cell phones, which are not allowed inside — was arrested and charged with distribution of the drug.

Security officer Carl Hornberger said he was working the courthouse metal detector when he told Ronald E. Hall Jr. to empty his pockets. Out tumbled Hall's cell phone and a half-ounce bag of marijuana.

"You can't bring that crap in here," Hornberger said.

Hall, 22, took the phone and the drugs and hid them in the bushes outside, then passed the security checkpoint and continued upstairs.

Hornberger summoned a police officer, who waited for Hall to return and watched as he retrieved the phone and the pot, Hampton Police Cpl. Allison Good told the Daily Press newspaper.

My Arresting Officer Smells Like Flowers

AHMADABAD, India (AP) — Soothing rose or tangy lemon?

If all goes according to plan, people in the western Indian city of Ahmadabad should find themselves confronted by those two scents by the end of the year when they are stopped by police.

The city's police department is working with a team of designers to provide 8,000 officers with new uniforms that will be made with specially scented, lightweight fabric designed to keep the police officers sweet smelling and sweat free.

"We think that by end of the year, you will notice a new fresh look when you are intercepted by one of our men," said J. Mahapatra, the city's police commissioner.

Ahmadabad is brutally hot for half the year with summer temperatures well over 115 Fahrenheit, and its policemen, especially those directing traffic, can spend as many as eight hours a day outdoors.

It also doesn't help that a large number of the country's policemen are said to be overweight, a result of long work hours, poor eating habits and high stress.

Friendship Stronger Than Sweeps Week

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A television news anchor donated a kidney to his friend — a colleague at a rival station.

KABC-TV morning co-anchor Phillip Palmer underwent surgery early Wednesday to remove one of his kidneys. The kidney was then transplanted into Dale Davis, who works as a video editor for KCAL/KCBS-TV.

Palmer, who has been with KABC since 1998, told viewers Tuesday that Davis had no shortage of friends willing to help.

"Friends of his lined up to get tested just to see if they could be a living donor, and by giving Dale a kidney also give him a chance at returning to a normal life, a life that will hopefully allow him to see his cousin play college football and his two daughters one day walk down the aisle," he said.

KABC reported that Palmer and Davis were both doing well after surgery and that doctors said Davis' new kidney started functioning almost immediately.

Compiled by FOXNews.com's Sara Bonisteel.

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