Gov. Kathleen Blanco said she is not basing her re-election plans on whether former U.S. Sen. John Breaux chooses to enter the Louisiana governor's race.

Breaux is mulling a run for governor in the Oct. 20 primary and is considered a strong possible Democratic contender, possibly a stronger Democratic candidate than Blanco. He has said he will make a decision in the next two weeks, and speculation that he might run has fueled gossip that Blanco may drop out of the race.

However, the governor said Wednesday she has gotten assurances that Breaux would support her in the race if she runs for re-election, and again she said, "My plan is to run."

"My decision is predicated on me and my experience and not on anything that Sen. Breaux or anybody else might be interested in doing, but he has reiterated his support for me and said he would do whatever I'd ask," Blanco said.

Breaux released a statement through his spokesman, saying Blanco had "earned the right to run for re-election."

"Whatever help I can be to her and our State, I'm more than happy to provide," the former senator said in the statement.

Meanwhile, Republican U.S. Rep. Bobby Jindal reassured supporters this week that he intends to run for governor no matter who enters the race.

"I suspect we're going to hear rumors all the way up to Election Day," Jindal said in an interview. "We just wanted to reiterate. We just wanted to set ourselves apart from all that."

If Breaux runs for governor, he faces a likely legal dispute about whether he could be a legal candidate in Louisiana.

To be eligible to run for a statewide elected office, the Louisiana Constitution requires that a person be a "citizen" of the state for "at least the preceding five years."

Breaux is registered to vote and lists his primary address in Maryland, about 70 miles from Washington, where he works for the lobbying firm of Patton Boggs. Republicans say that would disqualify him from running for Louisiana governor.