In a new attempt to get some of the estimated $40 million O.J. Simpson owes it, the family of Ron Goldman subpoenaed several Hollywood groups Monday for information on payments he may have received for "The Towering Inferno" and other past film and TV appearances.

The subpoenas demand records kept by the Screen Actors Guild, the Producers Guild of America and the American Federation of Television Radio Artists.

Lawyers for Goldman's father, Fred, say they believe the records will show how much in residual payments Simpson has received for appearing TV shows and films, including the "Naked Gun" series. They said records could also show where the money has gone.

"We've all seen 'Naked Gun' repeatedly on cable. Each time it's shown again, his residuals add up," said Goldman's attorney, David J. Cook. "This is a matter of turning every stone."

Representatives for SAG and AFTRA said they haven't received the subpoenas and couldn't comment. A call to a Producer's Guild spokesman was not returned Monday.

The Goldman family has been in a decade-long battle to get the money following a 1997 civil judgment that held Simpson liable for the deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ron Goldman. Simpson was acquitted at trial.

Fred Goldman alleges Simpson is trying to avoid paying the $33.5 million judgment, which has ballooned to about $40 million with interest.

A state judge last month issued a restraining order barring Simpson from spending or moving any earnings from past deals, including books, films, and sports memorabilia.

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Gerald Rosenberg's ruling later applied to the advance Simpson may have received for his unpublished book, "If I Did It."

The order will remain in effect until a Feb. 20 hearing.

Simpson's book reportedly described how he theoretically would have killed his ex-wife and Goldman. It was canceled by publisher HarperCollins in November amid widespread public outrage.