This is a partial transcript from "The O'Reilly Factor," January 31, 2006, that has been edited for clarity.

BILL O'REILLY, HOST: And in the "impact" segment tonight, on Monday, we showed you the anti-Iraq War rally in D.C. last weekend. Its focused celebrities — Jane Fonda, Sean Penn, Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins.

Now many of you wanted to see more of those chats. And we have a lot more to show you. Roll it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you think we'll be able to get the troops out of Iraq?

JANE FONDA, ACTRESS: Yes, I do, sooner rather than later.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Are you concerned that if we pull the troops out of Iraq, that there might be continued civilian casualties?

FONDA: Can't be worse than it is now.

MARK LIBMAN, ANTI-WAR PROTESTOR: ...Dear Mr. President, dear Mr. President.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now what about - Ms. Fonda, what about after we left Vietnam, three million people died. What do you think will happen if we leave Iraq?

Ms. Fonda, if we leave Iraq, do you think — after we left Vietnam, three million people died. What do you think will happen if we leave Iraq?

Ms. Fonda, we just wanted to follow up on the question about the people who died. After people died in Vietnam, what do you think might happen to the Iraqis? Are you concerned about what will happen to the Iraqis if we leave?

FONDA: I'm concerned about what's happening to the Iraqis right now.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What do you think about what happened to the three million Vietnamese and Cambodians who died after the U.S. troops left Vietnam?

FONDA: It's too bad that we caused it to happen by going in there in the first place.

LIBMAN: Dear Mr. President, dear Mr. President, why keep lying all the time. Dear Mr. President.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Are you concerned about what might happen to the Iraqis if we pull out of Iraq, that there might be more violence and more Iraqis might die if U.S. troops pull out of there?

SEAN PENN, ACTOR: You have to understand that I was in Iraq prior to the war. And I'm very concerned about the people that I met, people with children.

We spend over $1 billion a day on this war. I think that with those funds, we can find some way of creating a security force that isn't one that sacrifices continued American lives on a daily basis and uses this kind of heavy armament to kill civilians.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is the United States the problem in Iraq?

TIM ROBBINS, ACTOR: Yes, yes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you want us to prevail in Iraq?

ROBBINS: What is prevailing in Iraq? Tell me what that is. What side are we going to take in this civil war? And then once we take that side, aren't we heading down the path of ethnic cleansing?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You think we're heading down the path of ethnic cleansing or could we.

ROBBINS: If you decide in a civil war, you are headed down a path toward ethnic cleansing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Are you concerned that that might happen if we leave altogether?

ROBBINS: I'm concerned that that might be happening already.

LIBMAN: How many people have you stuck in a cage, dear Mr. President, dear Mr. President.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: How do you think the United States should deal with Iran? What about Iran? What do we do if they continue to defy the United Nations in terms of pursuing their nuclear program?

PENN: And defy, by defy the United Nations, are we talking like our unilateral invasion of Iraq? Is that kind of defying of the United Nations we're talking about?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No, I'm talking about the Iranian nuclear program that the U.N. has told them to stop.

Ms. Sarandon, are you worried about what George W. Bush might do in Iran? And what do you — how do you think we should handle Iran?

SUSAN SARANDON, ACTRESS: You know, I — this idea that you only use diplomacy as a reward for people who already agree with you is pretty backwards.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: But if diplomacy doesn't work, how far can we let Iran go in terms of their nuclear program? Are we worried about them getting nuked?

SARANDON: You know, we keep giving nuclear energy to all these countries. We gave it to India for melons or mangos or something. I mean, we're very hypocritical talking about everyone else limiting their nuclear capability. We give nuclear power to people that — as a little perk. It's a little party favor.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What do you think we should do in Iran? How do we prevent them from getting nuclear weapons?

ROBBINS: I don't know. Bombing them. Is that going to keep them from getting nuclear weapons? Killing more innocent civilians? Is that going to help?

CROWD: Two, four, six, eight, who do we incarcerate...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Ms. Fonda, would you like to come on "The O'Reilly Factor" and speak with Bill O'Reilly about the situation in Iraq or Iran? Interested in talking to Bill O'Reilly?

FONDA: No one's interested in talking to Bill O'Reilly. He doesn't exist.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: Here I am.

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