A graphic new video surfaced Monday on the Web appearing to show the body of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein immediately after he was hanged a little more than a week ago.

The 27-second video, posted on Google, appears to show Saddam's body on a gurney, covered with a bloodied white shroud that is removed so the person videotaping — possibly with a cell phone camera — has a clear shot at his head and neck. A large and gaping wound is visible on the neck.

A video purporting to show the body of Saddam Hussein is posted on Google Video.

Warning: The content is extremely graphic and may be disturbing to some viewers.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO.

Saddam was hanged on Dec. 30, 2006.

In the video, translated for FOX News, the men are heard rushing to allow someone to take the video seemingly fearing they will be discovered:

Abu Ali!

— Hurry up! Hurry up!

Hurry up!

Let’s go my friend…Come on man!

— I’ll fix it up for you.

I am coming. I am coming.

— Just a moment, one moment

I am coming. I am coming.

— Abu Ali, Abu Ali… You take care of this.

OK let’s go, let’s go

— Come on my friend! Come on my friend!

OK, I am coming. I am coming.

A controversy arose immediately after the hanging when a video recording the event on a cell phone camera showed up on the Web.

The leaked and unauthorized cell phone video, in which some of those present can be heard to taunt Saddam in the final moments of his life, set off an uproar both inside and outside Iraq.

A member of Saddam's legal team said Sunday that she is going to file a lawsuit against the Iraqi government over the former leader's treatment by executioners on the gallows.

Bushra al-Khalil told the Saudi daily al-Watan that she will sue the Iraqi authorities for allowing two of Saddam's personal foes to attend the execution and over reports that executioners had abused the dead body of the former leader.

It is suspected that Saddam's legal team is using the controversial footage to delay the execution of Saddam's half brother and the head of Iraq's Revolutionary Court.

The new video surfaced on a day when Saddam's voice once again boomed through a Baghdad courtroom.

Audiotapes played at the so-called Anfal trial Monday revealed Saddam and his cousin Ali Hassan al-Majid, known as "Chemical Ali," discussing killing thousands of Kurds in the 1980s.

The court's first order of business was the formality of dismissing charges against Saddam. "Chemical Ali" will remain in the dock, charged with killing 180,000 Kurds in the 1980s as Iraq fought a protracted war with neighboring Iran.