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Girls Gone Wild: Texas Cheerleaders Terrorize Town

This is a partial transcript from "On the Record," January 4, 2007, that has been edited for clarity.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, HOST: All right, is it a real-life case of mean girls meets girls gone wild? One red-hot scandal is rocking a Texas town. Well, hang onto your seats. The "Fab Five," as they were known, ran wild. These five cheerleaders were known for raising hell across a suburban Dallas high school. There were dirty photos of the girls, too. They put them on the Internet. And the "Fab Five" ringleader: the daughter of the school principal.

Joining us from Dallas, Gretel Kolach, Newsweek's special correspondent. Greta, any update in the last 24 hours on this continuing saga? I guess there's a lot of national attention on it.

GRETEL KOVACH, NEWSWEEK: No, it continues to percolate. Well, now we have some of the other McKinney High School students who claim to have been terrorized and bullied coming out on different TV shows, saying that you know, slogans were spray-painted on their house and they were — her house was toilet papered and she had to transfer schools. And so, one of the parents I spoke to said, "My daughter, who was one of the so-called 'Fab Five,' never had any problems with other students." And I think there has been information surfacing that, yes, they were popular, they were attractive, but many students resented them because they saw them as being above the rules and it wasn't a good situation.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right, so we've got these five girls who have declared themselves the "Fab Five," they're the cheerleaders, the popular girls in the high school. They now seem to have, basically, you know, three main problems. One is they gave teachers a hard time, two is the bullied other classmates, and three is they put these pictures on the Internet that are not particularly, you know, maybe tasteful — maybe parents don't like them. Are those the three categories, the problems these girls have?

KOVACH: Yes, I'd say that's correct. The issues are, did these girls have star status and where they enabled by the principal who happen to be the mother of one of them? And according to the lawyer who investigated the case, Harry Jones, he found that to be valid. And another issue has been what's been somewhat disturbing to old folks like me, and I am only 31, has been the overt sexuality on display here. I think educators and parents are dealing with this all across the country. It's the Britney Spears/Paris Hilton effect.

VAN SUSTEREN: But is that high school — whether it's — I mean, are these girls so profoundly different, do you think, than girl scouts and high school across the country?

KOVACH: You know, I'm not sure about that. I'm not sure if they're different or if they just messed up by putting the evidence onto the Internet where everyone could see it and trade and pass it around and hand it to journalists, like me and other folks.

So, I do not think this is an isolated incident. I think that things got particularly out of hand, maybe, at this one high school because the principal happened to be one of the mothers involved. But, we're hearing from schools all over that this kind of behavior is a problem all across the country, and that's what we have read in the comments on the Web sites. We've had, you know, 150 people write in from all across the country saying, "Yeah, we know these girls, they're in our towns, they're in our schools."

VAN SUSTEREN: They're all over the place. All right, Gretel, thank you very much.

And the school's principal, Linda Theret, is the mother of one of the
"Fab Five" cheerleaders, as she just said — the alleged ring leader. Her attorney, Bob Hinton, joins us now from Lubbockc, Texas, by phone.

Bob, I guess I'm having a hard time understanding whether this is so extraordinary, or this is just sort of, you know, bad juvenile, typical conduct all across the country and that, you know, while it's certainly we applaud, bullying other kids — if it's so extraordinary.

BOB HINTON, ATTORNEY FOR LINDA THERET: You know, this is not any different from any other little town, big town USA. These are some girls who are a little out of hand and a little bit too big for their britches.

The fact Linda Theret was one of the them had nothing to do with this issues. She was, by virtue of the conflict, policy-wise not in the disciplinary band here. Never took disciplinary action at all. Recommended disciplinary action that was not taken by the other people, including the main person who is — I think at fault here, is Tom Crowe
(ph), the superintendent of schools.

VAN SUSTEREN: Well, let me say one thing, though, is that Linda's in the school. I mean, if these kids are bullying other kids, I mean, I certainly would think she would be in a position to see it and take action. I mean, so it's not quite, you know, as you suggest — at least I don't see it that way. I mean, she must have known that was — that something was awry. Maybe not the pictures on the Internet, but knows that her daughter is part of a group that's considered to be particularly obnoxious to other kids and teachers.

HINTON: Well, it wasn't that way. It wasn't that way. And Linda did the best she could do under the circumstances that she had as a single mother. She did an excellent job of raising three girls. This girl is not a monster at all. The "Fab Five" are just popular girls that are just — not unlike girls at every other campus across the country. This is a situation where the report, which is completely faulty, the conclusions which are completely false, seem to indicate that Linda Theret had something to do with the discipline, that it was not enough of discipline for these girls for circumstances.

VAN SUSTEREN: You know, what? I have a little problem with the report. It cost $40,000 hiring a lawyer to do this report? I mean, I think that's a little bit extravagant. What — $40,000?

HINTON: Well, he billed $40,000 by the time his report was prepared, and he's still willing the devil out of this deal, and the report reads like a 10-step novel. And it better find somebody at fault for him to justify that kind of money, but he's not an educator. He not an academician at all, he's a labor lawyer. He doesn't know (INAUDIBLE) about this stuff.

VAN SUSTEREN: I was just sort of stunned by a $40,000 bill from a lawyer doing a report on this. But anyway, we'll keep looking at this and maybe we'll get the lawyer on and he can explain his bill and the report, as well.

Bob, thank you.

HINTON: Greta, ask yourself, what kind of a lawyer can drop everything and spend three and half weeks doing nothing but this?

VAN SUSTEREN: Can I take the fifth Bob?

HINTON: Roger Cossack and I say hello.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right Bob, thank you.

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