Conservative female professionals by day, down and dirty Jell-O wrestlers by night. These are the lives of a group of women on New York City's Lower East Side who have taken to the sport of "amateur female Jell-O wrestling" to release their pent-up aggressions.

The women, who go by pseudonyms such as Sandra Claws, Tinsel the Bohemian Christmas Fairy, Chocolate Thunder and Backhand Betty, gather at a bar to do battle in a blow-up kiddie pool full of clear, unflavored gelatin, Reuters reported.

The 11 female participants swear that the sport is empowering and is not about naked women rolling around for drooling male spectators.

"We work hard to promote it as a feminist thing and the night is really like a community night in that it is really what the women make of it," said Annie Rock, 26, one of the organizers.

The show, which happens once a month, is completely put together by women, and they agree that the sport is "fun, friendly competition."

"It's definitely aggression release. It's sexy as well, throwing women around in Jell-O," said participant Mickie King, a 33-year-old marketing manager.

And while the competition is not designed for men, the ladies work to get them into the silly spirit too, bringing several willing males onstage for a hoola hoop contest.

The door price also reflects female favoritism: $3 entry fee for women, $7 for men accompanied by women and $15 for men alone.

"It's really hard to explain to my mother," said 31-year-old organizer Dana Sterling, who works as a lighting designer. It is a sport, it's a satire sport."

Just How Do You Pronounce That Again?

People in Fjuckby, Sweden, have finally had enough.

Globalization has led to the town's name being associated with a similar sounding English word, leading residents to endure relentless ridicule, reported Sweden's The Local.

But it's not only the English translation … in Swedish, the word "juck" basically means the same thing as Fjuckby's English component.

The unhappy villagers are hoping that the National Heritage Board will see it their way and eliminate the bane of the Fjuckby name, granting them something less laugh-inducing.

"There should not be any doubt at all that, as a result of relatively new associations, the pronunciation and spelling of the place name 'Fjuckby,' today arouses ridicule, teasing and hilarity in the general public," wrote Katriina Flensburg on behalf of herself and her neighbors.

"This regrettable fact engenders feelings of weariness, embarrassment and conditioned shame among villagers, who are often forced against their will to take a tiresome 'defensive stance' with regard to the name of their home town," the letter continued.

The delegation has requested that the name Fjukeby be reinstated. This was the common spelling up until as late as the 1930s.

If Fjuckby gets its way it's possible that cities such as Anusviken, Arslet and Dicken may fight to be the next in line to eliminate their embarrassment.

Parolees Peddle Christmas Spirit

GREENWOOD, Ind. (AP) — Faced with a shortage of bell-ringers, the Salvation Army has turned to an unlikely source — parolees — to help bring in cash this holiday.

Major Richard Hartman said about half of the Salvation Army's Red Kettle campaign bell-ringers in Johnson County are nonviolent offenders finishing up community service sentences.

"When you're out there ringing the bell and wishing people a Merry Christmas you're giving back to the community," Hartman said.

Greenwood City Court Judge Lewis Gregory had to approve the program because using individuals with misdemeanors like public intoxication or marijuana possession raised concerns about safety.

"We did want to be sure that the donations went to the Salvation Army and that there wasn't much of an opportunity for any of the money to disappear," Gregory said.

To that end, the Salvation Army decided to have the collection buckets chained and locked "so they just can't grab a bucket and walk away with it," Hartman said.

He said that, so far, the program has been problem-free.

Does It Count as a Dog When It Can't Bark, Only Squeak?

LARGO, Fla. (AP) — Brandy the Chihuahua is 6 inches long and weighs less that 2 pounds. She's not allowed on the furniture because if she jumped off, she would break.

She's also, according the Guinness World Records book, officially the Smallest Dog in the World.

Brandy's owner, Paulette Keller, carries her around in a sheepskin-lined purse. You don't pet Brandy so much as rub her with a thumb and forefinger.

Brandy made the transformation from Keller's lap ornament to the smallest dog in the world over a year ago. A breeder told Keller she thought Brandy was smaller than the smallest dog in the Guinness book.

Keller took Brandy to the vet, who signed papers listing her vital statistics. Bug-eyed Brandy made the Guinness' 2006 edition, on the same page with the dog who can fit five tennis balls in its mouth.

"I just love her," Keller said. "It wouldn't matter if she's the smallest. She's just a really sweet dog."

3 Flats Make for a Tough Getaway

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — They say it's smart to check your tires before going on a trip. That's especially true if it's a getaway car.

Police in Fayetteville say a man robbed a dry cleaners around 8:40 yesterday morning. As he tried to make his getaway, a police officer noticed that the man's car had a flat tire. The driver couldn't control the car and hit the curb, making two more tires go flat.

Officers tried to stop the car, but the suspect stopped at another dry cleaners. He tried to steal a customer's car, but police dragged him out before he could take off.

A spokeswoman for the police department says Jerome Dodenhoss is charged with common law robbery and larceny of a motor vehicle.

Compiled by FOXNews.com's Hannah Sentenac.

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