In response to my article on Denis Hastert, you agreed that finger-pointing and forgetfulness is characteristic of both Democrats and Republicans in times of scandal. The question is: what can we do about it?

David Corbin of Derry, N.H, writes:

“Great article. I just hope something will come out of all this and not the usual 'brushed under the rug' politics.”

SRE: Agreed! Will both sides hold their parties accountable in the polls?

Ron Sinclair of Candia, N.H. writes:

“We are in agreement that there is a stench rising from D.C., and my point is that it is coming from Democrats and Republicans alike. I get really annoyed with the statements of Nancy Pelosi, that she intends to 'drain the Republican swamp' if she becomes Speaker of the House. My thought is that if she does manage to drain the swamp, many of her Democrat colleagues will be swept away, along with their Republican counterparts.

Both parties are equally guilty in my mind, neither more so than the other. I frankly do not know what we citizens can do about it, other than clean house. Meaning that no incumbents get re-elected, regardless of party. Let's throw them all out, and start over again with a cleaner slate.”

SRE: That’s one solution. I think most Americans don’t know who to trust.

Brian Boyington writes:

“Hastert required that Foley immediately resign. I do agree that the 'overly friendly' e-mails should have been a 'red flag.' Foley should have been requested (pressured) to step aside and let another Republican run for his seat. If this information was made public six months ago, that would surely have happened. I do question the timing of the information being made public. I wonder how long the information was known and sat upon prior to the revelation.”

SRE: It seems to have been sat upon until being caught was imminent.

As for my book on Ann Coulter, I received no less than 500 email messages. Some of you thought I needed a sense of humor and some were upset that I validated Ann by responding at all. I think she deserves a response because she influences political discourse.

J. Knepler writes:

Susan, why don't you try answering Ann Coulter's arguments, point for point, instead of just calling her names? When did legitimate political discourse become hate speech? Really, what has happened to Liberalism in the last 20 years? Is there a Democrat at the national level who will deal honestly with the issues that Coulter raises?

I have never seen Liberal Democrats, and their sycophants in the mainstream media, generate so much vitriol, so many personal attacks, in 40 years of following politics and current events. You've become a female version of Al Franken. It’s really sad.”

SRE: Unfortunately the space of my article may not have provided for this, but my book does answer her point for point. I respond to her theses on victims in political discourse, abortion, evolution and the public schools. I think that because her prose are so shocking, I am one of the first to actually go beyond the words and address her ideas.

Corey Vandenberg writes:

“Its so nice to see someone who sees Ann for what she is, and I’m a conservative. A libertarian one, but conservative nonetheless.

I was absolutely disgusted when I heard the comments that were made about the 9-11 wives, but it was far from the first time that I had been dismayed and shocked that this woman is being touted as someone who speaks for those who believe in God and those who believe in conservative political values.”

SRE: Thank you! I think we shouldn’t have to frame our ideas that way to get a step at the microphone.

Susan Estrich is currently the Robert Kingsley Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of Southern California and a member of the Board of Contributors of USA Today. She writes the "Portia" column for American Lawyer Media and is a contributing editor of The Los Angeles Times. She was appointed by the president to serve on the National Holocaust Council and by the mayor of the City of Los Angeles to serve on that city's Ethics Commission.

A woman of firsts, she was the first woman president of the Harvard Law Review and the first woman to head a national presidential campaign (Dukakis). Estrich is committed to paving the way for women to assume positions of leadership.

Books by Estrich include "Real Rape," "Getting Away with Murder: How Politics is Destroying the Criminal Justice System" and "Dealing with Dangerous Offenders." Her book "Making the Case for Yourself: A Diet Book for Smart Women," is a departure from her other works, encouraging women to take care of themselves by engaging the mind to fight for a healthy body. Her latest book, The Los Angeles Times bestseller, "Sex & Power," takes an impassioned look at the division of power between men and women in the American workforce, proving that the idea of gender equality is still just an idea.