This Sunday, tune in at 8 p.m. ET for a special War Stories Investigates: The Jihad for an in-depth look at the development of the philosophy of the modern global jihad, and to find out how these key figures contributed to the idea of a holy war against the West.

AP
Usama bin Laden

Born on July 30, 1957 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, bin Laden was the son of Mohammad bin Laden, one of the country's wealthiest business leaders. In 1968, his father died in a helicopter crash, and at the age of 13, bin Laden inherited $80 million. His sworn hostility to the U.S. stems from Saudi Arabia's 1990 decision to allow the U.S. to station troops there after Iraq invaded Kuwait. In 1996, he issued a fatwa urging Muslims to kill American forces in Saudi Arabia and Somalia. A second fatwa in 1998 expanded to include all Americans.





AP
Ramzi Yousef

"Next time I'll have more money, I'll come back and I'll bring those towers down." Convicted of masterminding the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center, and currently serving 240 years in prison without parole — the vast majority of it will be spent in solitary confinement. Yousef was only arrested in 1995, after a defector from his group in Pakistan informed on him. He was also sentenced for plotting to blow up 12 American passenger aircrafts and for planting a bomb on a Philippines Airlines flight, which killed one person.






AP
Adam Gadahn

Born September 1, 1978, Gadahn became the first U.S. citizen charged with treason since World War II in October of 2006. He grew up on a goat farm in southern California, and is also known as “Azzam the American.” The FBI believes he is currently a fugitive in or near Pakistan. Gadahn converted to Islam as a teenager and most recently appeared in a video with Al Qaeda ideologue, Ayman al-Zawahiri. If captured and convicted, he could face the death penalty.






AP
Hassan Nasrallah

Born in Beirut, Lebanon, on August 31, 1960, Nasrallah studied Islam in Iraq before being forced to leave in 1978. Nasrallah joined Hezbollah after the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon, and became leader of Hezbollah a decade later, after Abbas al-Musawi was assassinated by Israel. Has been quoted as saying, "There is no solution to the conflict in this region except with the disappearance of Israel."







AP
Ayman al-Zawahiri

Born in Cairo, Egypt on June 19, 1951, al-Zawahiri joined the "Muslim Brotherhood" at the age of 14. Today, he is regarded as Al Qaeda’s No. 2 man. He is also the former head of the terrorist organization, the Egyptian Islamic Jihad, which merged with Al Qaeda in 1998. A joint fatwa he issued with Usama bin Laden against the infidels in the West confirmed the merger. Zawahiri took part in the plot to kill Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in 1981. He was also convicted in absentia in 1999 for the massacre of 58 tourists in Luxor, Egypt. Zawahiri is also a medical doctor and it is assumed that he cares for the ailing bin Laden. The U.S. State Department has a $25 million reward for information leading toward his capture.




AP
Omar Abdel Rahman (a.k.a. the Blind Sheikh)

Born on May 3, 1938 in Egypt, Rahman lost his eyesight as a boy due to diabetes, and studied the Koran in Braille. As the leader of the terrorist organization al-Gama al-Islamiyya (The Islamic Group), Rahman, along with Ayman al-Zawahiri, was involved in the assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in 1981. Rahman was thrown out of the country when he wasn’t convicted for Sadat’s murder, and came to New York in 1990. He is now in custody at a Supermax prison facility in Colorado, serving a life sentence for conspiring to blow up the Lincoln Tunnel, George Washington Bridge, and other sites in the New York City area. He was convicted in a spin-off investigation, as the prosecution of Ramzi Yousef was being unraveled.




AP
Mohammed Ali Hamadi

Born on June 13, 1964, in Lebanon, Hamedi was a member of Hezbollah and took part in the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847. The hijacking lasted 17 days and claimed the life of U.S. Navy Diver, Robert Stethem. Hamedi was tried and convicted for crimes stemming from TWA 847 in West Germany in 1987. He was apprehended there when he attempted to smuggle liquid explosives into the country. Hamadi served just 18 years of a life sentence and was released in December 2005. He is now back in Lebanon, where the United States is seeking his extradition. Hamadi may be back with Hezbollah, and is currently one of the FBI’s Most Wanted Fugitives.