You've got to be kidding me about this Katie Couric doctored photo "controversy."

So they made her look thinner using Photoshop. This is hardly a big deal.

Come on, people. Are we all that naive? Doctored photos are the very least of what's done to make celebrities look better. And like her or not, Couric is a celebrity, and she's nowhere near as bad as the majority of the beautiful people.

These people have plastic surgery like you get your hair cut. Did you see the original "Charlie's Angels" crew at the Emmys?

Kate Jackson and Farrah Fawcett looked like they had their eyes pulled back to their foreheads. They looked like aliens. Michael Jackson's nose is a liquefied mess of cartilage after so many surgeries, and Star Jones lost dozens of pounds by getting her stomach stapled — allegedly.

Plastic surgery is so ubiquitous that there have been numerous reality shows on the subject, "Dr. 90210," "The Swan" and "I Want A Famous Face" among them.

I was flipping through the channels the other night looking for a "Girls Gone Wild" infomercial when I came across "Dr. 90210" during a tummy-tuck procedure that saw a doctor walking across the operating room with a handful of flesh and fat.

It looked like a giant bowl of flan!

Boy, do I miss the days when plastic surgery was an underground thing, when people snuck off for a two-week vacation and returned looking a bit different. Nose jobs, eye lifts and liposuction used to be the dirty little secret of showbiz types.

Now, gift certificates for plastic surgery are included in awards show goodie bags, and plastic surgeons are bragging on their Web sites about the famous people they've worked on.

But that's not all. It's customary for the beautiful people who grace magazine covers, host television shows or anchor the news to have hair and makeup people on hand to help make them look just right.

Add lighting, the right framing and the right set, and you're only halfway there.

A little sharpening of the image on top of adjusting the colors and brightness and contrast is standard operating procedure.

Now, if you really want something to Grrr! about when it comes to altered photos, Reuters journalists and photographers have reported that international photographers regularly have corpses dug up from their graves and stage rescue operations for their photo essays in places like Beirut and more than likely — although not included in the Reuters report — Bosnia and Kosovo.

That's more than a little doctoring. That's fabricating news. Fabricating one's physical appearance is harmless in comparison.

And yes, I still wear lifts when I do red carpet interviews, like in the videos on our television page.

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