Lucas Glover and Davis Love III are showing they, too, want to play with Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson.

Glover, one of several players still trying to lock up a spot on the U.S. Ryder Cup team, got his bid off to a strong start. He shot a 6-under 66 Thursday to take the early lead at The PGA Championship on Thursday. Love, who has the longest active streak of Ryder Cup appearances for the Americans but needs a top finish this week to make it seven straight, made the turn at 6-under.

"We're all chasing the same goal," Glover said. "It's just like looking at the leaderboard on the 18th tee on Sunday if you're in the hunt. You're all vying for the same thing, you all want it, and that's the goal."

Billy Andrade went from seventh alternate to the leaderboard with a 5-under 67. Andrade got into the tournament when Steve Elkington withdrew.

Stewart Cink and J.J. Henry, also in the Ryder Cup derby, were part of the pack at 4-under. Robert Allenby and Luke Donald, who went to nearby Northwestern and still lives in Chicago, also shot 68s.

Woods and Mickelson were three strokes off the lead, shooting matching 69s.

"We both played OK today," said Mickelson, the defending PGA champion. "But we both had chances to go lower."

Joining them at 3-under was a pack that included playing partner Geoff Ogilvy, the U.S. Open champion, and Billy Mayfair, who was playing two weeks after surgery for testicular cancer.

"I was just along for the ride," Ogilvy said. "I had the best seat in the house."

• Get your golf news fix at FOXSports.com

Sergio Garcia, who made a name for himself with his runner-up finish the last time the PGA was at Medinah Country Club, was to tee off in the afternoon with Fred Couples and Ernie Els. Jim Furyk and Vijay Singh also had afternoon tee times.

Woods and Mickelson are the top players in the world these days, with 14 majors between them and five of the last seven. But they rarely play together — only 15 times overall. This was only the fourth time at a major, and the first since the final round of the 2001 Masters, which Woods won.

The two aren't particularly close, either, and their relationship is psychoanalyzed more than that of any Hollywood couple. Fans like one or the other, but rarely both. So it was little surprise that several hundred people hiked out to the par-5 10th, the farthest corner of a 7,561-yard course that's the longest in majors history, to see them tee off.

"I think most of them got lost, couldn't find No. 10," Woods said. "It's way ... out there."

But the only stir they caused was on the leaderboard.

"A fun day," Mickelson said. "We all played OK. We had a good time."

Mickelson took the edge early, two-putting from 35 feet for a birdie on the par-5 10th. Woods, meanwhile, found trouble almost everywhere he looked on the first hole.

His first drive landed in rough so deep on the left the marshals needed help from spectators to locate it. He got back in the fairway with his second shot, but it was still well short of the hole. He flew the green with his third shot and flipped his club at his bag in disgust. He then ran his chip shot past the hole and down a hill, leaving him a 30-foot putt for par.

It stopped 2 feet short. Bogey.

But Woods made a nice recovery, including an improbable birdie on the longest hole of the course, the 605-yard, par-5 No. 14. Woods never did see the fairway on the hole. His drive landed in the left rough, and he chunked his second shot into more rough.

That left him with a blind shot to the green, but Woods put it within 30 feet and made the putt for birdie. He came close to another on the par-3 17th, with his 30-foot downhill putt stopping at the edge of the cup.

While Woods was warming up, Mickelson was scrambling. He had to get up-and-down to save pars after missing the greens on 16, 17 and 18, and bogeyed the par-3 No. 2.

But he had birdies on two of his last four holes to get to 3-under.

"I put myself in position where a good round tomorrow will vault you up the leaderboard," Mickelson said. "It's not just Tiger, it's 155 other guys."

The top 10 players in a points system make the Ryder Cup team, along with two captain's picks. Five players have clinched spots, including Woods and Mickelson, and British Open runner-up Chris DiMarco is a virtual lock for a sixth.

But there are plenty of players who want those last four spots, including Glover, Cink, Henry, Jerry Kelly and Zach Johnson, who had an afternoon tee time. Brett Wetterich, 10th in the standings at the start of the week, might have cost himself a spot with quadruple bogeys on Nos. 12 and 17. He finished at 4-over 76.

"Every day, every minute, every second for the last six months," Glover said when asked how often he thinks about the Ryder Cup. "I had decided to put that behind me this week and try to just play golf, have fun and not worry about it. But play well, and let it take care of itself."

Mayfair, who turned 40 on Aug. 6, was thrilled simply to be at Medinah Country Club after his right testicle was removed two weeks ago. He learned last week that the cancer hadn't spread, but he will have to be tested every two or three months or go through two weeks of radiation and be tested once or twice a year.

This week, though, is for golf. Mayfair was bogey-free for his first nine holes, then jumped to the top of the leaderboard with birdies on the par-5 No. 10 and the par-4 No. 11.

But he fell back to the pack with three bogeys in a four-hole span.

Cancer has been a common topic at the PGA Championship, starting with the death of Heather Clarke, who was 39. A half-hour before the tournament began, U.S. Ryder Cup captain Tom Lehman led a brief memorial service for her, and her funeral in Portrush, Ireland, was about an hour later.

Lehman did not know Heather Clarke, but was asked to speak because others were so saddened they didn't think they could get through. Lehman, who also spoke at a service for Payne Stewart in the '99 Tour Championship, urged everyone to be friends and supporters of Clarke and his two young sons.