How does this happen?

Let me read from the Twin Cities Pioneer Press, dateline Lincoln, Nebraska:

"Kevin Holder's rap sheet is 43 pages long, dating back to 1980, and he just got another entry — his 226 arrest. Police say they caught him Sunday morning after a brief chase and found burglar tools in his possession. 'He's very well-known to Lincoln police officers,' Police Chief Tom Casady said."

You might think that with 226 arrests you might have done a lot of time in prison. This guy has done some, but not what you'd call a lot. He's been sentenced to three prison terms including one four-year stretch.

How do you get arrested over 225 times in over 26 years and not end up sitting in prison a long, long time? That's almost once a month if you take the four years in prison out, when I suppose it was impossible to get arrested.

Police Chief Casady said: "Your average Nebraskan thinks after a prisoner has committed a certain number of crimes (he) will be put away for a long period of time. That doesn't happen."

I guess not.

In fact, it appears that in Nebraska they keep a revolving door at the jail. That's because Kevin Holder doesn't even come close to setting the record.

The paper says: "A number of people have more than 500 arrests in the city of 226,000 people. The record was held by Edward Rooks, who died in 2004, with 652 arrests."

I know the police chief doesn't need any advice from me, but I'd just like to point out that if people who get arrested a lot actually went to jail a lot — for a long time — they wouldn't be able to set arrest records.

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