The head-butt heard 'round the world.

Even if you're not a soccer fan — and I'm not much of one — you must have heard about or even seen the head-butt by the French soccer player during the World Cup that got him kicked out of the game — match they call it — and might have lead to Italy winning.

I was listening to the BBC this morning. They were shocked, stunned, gobsmacked, flabbergasted, knicker-twisted about the head-butt. One stupefied Brit anchor called it "a moment of madness."

I didn't quite get it. I guess these BBC anchors don't notice what goes on in the stands between fans during these matches, or games as we would call them.

One crummy little head-butt and you would have thought the world had ended. I've seen worse in peewee hockey. Much worse in baseball, basketball and football. We all have.

Now the fact we've all seen worse doesn't make it right, but we go through our gyrations about kicking the overpaid thugs out of the game and the league management ignores us and life goes on.

But not the Brits. Not the World Cup fans.

The French were wailing, "Pourquoi? Pourquoi?" Why, why, why?

Well the guy that did the head-butting was evidently angry. He might have been mad as in angry, but not mad as in crazy. Sometimes someone deserves a good smack, and in soccer they simply don't use their hands for anything. So he had a choice of kicking the guy or head-butting him.

I would also point out he didn't head-butt him in the head and break his nose. He just smacked him in the chest and the Italian player went down in an Oscar-worthy display of drama and thespian skill.

What was the cause? Nobody except the head-butter and the head-buttee know right now, but it's a safe bet it was an insult.

American baseball players are great at insults: about race, about someone's mother, wife, sister, about an opposing player's ability, mostly inability. Sometimes that's what's behind a high and tight fastball at 90 mph.

That's way worse than a head-butt, and you hardly ever hear the American announcer get the vapors and start prattling on about a moment of madness.

Hey, the guy was ticked. His team lost. He's in trouble. Life goes on.

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