Menu

Jury Ends Day 2 of Deliberations With No Decision on Moussaoui's Fate

Jurors in the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui completed their second day of deliberations Tuesday without deciding whether the Sept. 11 conspirator should receive a death sentence or life in prison.

They went home after working 6 3/4 hours, bringing their total deliberations over two days to 9 3/4 hours. They will return Wednesday morning.

Earlier in the day, they asked for but were denied a dictionary.

Before lunch, the jurors — and Moussaoui — filed into the courtroom to hear Judge Leonie Brinkema's response to the request.

Brinkema told them that sending a dictionary in would be like adding evidence in the case, but she invited them to come back if they had questions about specific definitions. They asked no additional questions Tuesday.

Brinkema also warned the jury against doing their own research, including looking up definitions.

After she and the jury left, Moussaoui said, "747 fly to London" — an apparent reference to his dream that President Bush will release him and he will fly to London.

The jury deliberated for three hours Monday after hearing closing arguments in the six-week trial.

The jury has only two choices: death or life in prison. Brinkema instructed jurors to balance all the factors that argue for death or life in making their decision. If the jury cannot reach an unanimous decision, Brinkema will automatically sentence him to life.

Before boarding a flight from Paris to the Washington area Tuesday to be with her son, Moussaoui's mother, Aicha El Wafi, told AP Television News, "My life is hell."

"This has been going on for four years, but now my life is hell. It's hell and that's all," she said. "I feel too much pain to speak." She has complained that her son was being made a scapegoat for the Sept. 11 attacks.

Moussaoui is the only person in this country charged in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The jury earlier found him eligible for execution by determining that his actions caused at least one death that day. Although Moussaoui was in jail on Sept. 11, the jury ruled that lies he told federal agents when he was arrested in August 2001 on immigration violations kept federal agents from identifying and stopping some of the hijackers.