This is a partial transcript from "Hannity & Colmes," April 17, 2006, that has been edited for clarity.

ALAN COLMES, CO-HOST: A movement calling for Mexico to take over America's Southwest to create a new nation called Aztlan has entered the immigration debate. Supporters of this movement participated in the recent nationwide immigration protest.

The Web site ImmigrationWatchdog.com has produced a three-minute videotape of speeches by Hispanic professors and elected officials making reference to Aztlan.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are not immigrants that came from another country to another country. We are migrants free to travel the length and breadth of the Americas, because we belong here.

We are millions. We just have to survive. We have an aging white America. They are not making babies. They're dying. It's a matter of time. The explosion is in our population.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COLMES: Joining us now, the man behind ImmigrationWatchdog.com, Brook Young.

Mr. Young, The Washington Times had a story on this whole movement just yesterday and quoted a number of people allegedly in this moment, and they say these are just fringe people. This is not what they're doing. This is really an effort on the part of anti-immigrant forces like yourself to gin up people's emotions in terms of there being a movement that really doesn't exist except on the far fringe.

BROOK YOUNG, IMMIGRATIONWATCHDOG.COM: Oh. Well, there's definitely a movement. This isn't a fringe movement. These are college professors speaking in this video. This is them. This is their voices. This is what they believe in. It's what they teach. These are political leaders of the Latino leaders.

COLMES: I'd like to know who's doing this. Fredrico Rangel of the University of Colorado. He's an officer at MEChA. And he says that this is a spiritual homeland; that's all it is. They're often misrepresented as wanting to secede or to take over America. And this is just ginning up anti-American fever. That's what's going on here. You want to respond?

YOUNG: You can look at their Web sites and look at what they believe in. It's pretty clear that they feel this is their homeland. They talk about Aztlan being stolen lands.

COLMES: Well, they're not — they're not literally looking over — to take over the United States or to reclaim parts of our land and call it Mexico. They claim that that is not at all what they're doing and this is more of a spiritual message than anything else.

YOUNG: Well, you listen to the voices in the video. They're authentic. Those are the Latino leaders saying what they're saying. There's no doubt...

COLMES: Can you name somebody who believes that? Can you name someone who is putting forth this idea that will stand by this and promote the idea that they really want to take over the United States?

YOUNG: Well, they're not going to come right out and say, "Yes, we're going to conquer the country."

COLMES: So there's nobody doing this.

YOUNG: But — of course — listen to what — every time Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa or Fabio Nunez opens their mouth, they're saying some seditious thing. These — they're very active in what they believe in. And...

SEAN HANNITY, CO-HOST: Mr. Young...

YOUNG: Yes.

HANNITY: ... Mr. Gutierrez, the political science professor who we heard on this tape, he seems to believe it. Am I wrong? I'm listening to him speak in his own words, isn't he one?

YOUNG: Definitely. And Herman Baca. Who — he's in the video. I videotaped him January speaking to this Latino forum and California Congressman Joe Baca was there. His son was there, Joe Baca Jr., who is a California assemblyman.

HANNITY: Let me — let me see if I can — let me see if I can walk through this with you. This group MEChA — and this was brought about — they are calling basically — do they have language in their plan, a document, a founding document that talks about their independence.

In their founding document, is it true that they decry, as was in The Washington Times, the quote, "Brutal gringo invasion" that they say in their founding document, the land is rightfully ours and will be fought for and defended? And isn't it true that the Los Angeles mayor belonged to this group, became an issue in his last campaign? Is that part of their document? Is that part of what they say?

YOUNG: That's on their Web sites. I have never, you know, infiltrated one of their meetings myself. But these metro groups, they're all over our high school campuses. They're all over college campuses. Wherever you have a large Latino population, you'll have MEChA. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was very much — he was the president of the UCLA chapter of MECHA.

HANNITY: Has he been challenged on the statements as reported about the founding document?

YOUNG: I don't think anybody has. You know, the media doesn't really talk about this sort of thing. And when people are marching in the streets, and they're holding up the signs saying that this is stolen land...

HANNITY: Right.

YOUNG: ... they look the other way and show the person who's holding the flag. Well, the American flag — well, that flag was given to them, a lot of times, by an organizer. And they just throw the flag in the garbage after the rally is done.

HANNITY: My question, though, really becomes this. Is this a widespread movement? And do you think it's anything that we ought to be concerned about? Or is this — are we talking about — are we talking about maybe people like the mayor, like Cruz Bustamante , that don't support what was in the original document, and maybe it's evolved since then into something very different?

YOUNG: It's — I'm not sure what they would like to lead people to believe that has evolved into. But there is a very hard core movement involved in this, involved in this belief of Aztlan and the stolen land theory.

A lot of the people, they'll tell you that, you know, we need to go back to Europe, because we're the illegals here in this country.

COLMES: All right, Mr. Young. If that's the truth, they should come on and state their case on this show, if we can find someone to take that position. We thank you very much.

YOUNG: I know some that would — I know a few that would love to do that.

COLMES: All righty. We'll check that out.

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