A North Carolina man didn't speed up when police started chasing his car — he slowed down.

That's because he wanted to finish smoking his crack cocaine, Dunn (N.C.) police told the Dunn Daily Record.

On the afternoon of Wed., Sept. 21, Officer John Parker noticed a white Buick with expired tags doing about 35 mph in the middle of town. He ran the plates, discovered the car had been stolen and gave chase.

The Buick's driver, local man James Ammons, 26, turned a corner and slowed to 25 mph. He put up both hands while still behind the wheel, and, according to Parker, clenched a crack pipe between his teeth.

Two more police cars joined the chase, which continued at a leisurely pace until Parker realized the caravan was heading for Interstate 95 on the eastern edge of town.

"It's always good to stop it before you get to 95," Parker told the paper. "As cracked up as he was, he might have killed himself."

The squad cars cornered the Buick in the parking lot of the Dunn American Legion (search) post, forcing the stolen car to come to a stop.

"We put a car in front of him," said Parker. "He only had two options: stop or pass us."

Still, Ammons apparently didn't get out. As more police cars pulled up, officers smashed in the driver's window and dragged him out.

According to officers present, Ammons was still holding his pipe as he was wrestled to the ground, trying to get in a few more blasts.

Ammons told police he'd been kicked out of a hospital in Lumberton, about 60 miles away, that morning, and had wandered past a car that just happened to have the keys in the ignition and two rocks of crack in the center cup holder.

He was booked on charges of possession of a stolen vehicle, possession of drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, refusing to stop for police and careless and reckless driving.

"He also stated that he knew he was going to go to jail," read the police report, "and that he wanted to smoke one more piece of crack before going."

— Thanks to Out There reader David A.

Middle-Aged Father of Six Playing College Football

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — As plays go in college football, it was a simple one — he lined up, took a couple of steps, caught a pass and ran for nine yards.

But it was anything but an ordinary play. That's because the ball was caught by Tim Frisby (search), a 40-year-old walk-on at the University of South Carolina (search).

Frisby joined the Gamecocks last season after serving 20 years in the Army and raising six children.

The man called "Pops" by his teammates and coaches always dreamed of playing football. Instead, he joined the Army after high school. After retiring from the military, Frisby enrolled at South Carolina, where he's studying broadcast journalism.

He also earned a spot on the Gamecocks. Teammates and coaches say he has worked as hard as anyone else on the team.

And with South Carolina leading handily on Saturday, Sept. 24, Coach Steve Spurrier decided it was time to put Frisby in the game. His catch came on his first play.

— Thanks to Out There reader Greg M.

Prison Authorities Launch Probe Into Illicit Yeast

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (AP) — Add yeast to the list of items not allowed in jails.

The Mesa County (search) sheriff's department recently confiscated two toothpaste tubes full of brewer's yeast that somebody tried to smuggle into the county jail.

Sheriff Stan Hilkey said the smuggling attempt wasn't surprising. What raised eyebrows was the source: the yeast, which can be used to make "jailhouse hooch," was found packed in with some uniforms shipped from a South Carolina jail-item supply company.

"It was awful suspicious," Hilkey said.

Initial tests on the substance were negative for marijuana, cocaine and hash, Hilkey said. Later, authorities determined the true nature of the substance.

"We're working with the vendor, who took it very, very seriously," Hilkey said.

He said the vendor, who he declined to identify, was conducting an internal investigation.

Hilkey said he figured either an inmate made a connection with a worker at the company's distribution center or somebody intercepted the package and repackaged the items with the yeast inside.

"We don't want to lay all the blame on the vendor," Hilkey said. "It could be something as benign as someone who used to be an inmate and he just wanted to brighten someone's day. We may never know."

Topeka Mayor Offended by Hallmark Card

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Don't send Mayor Bill Bunten (search) this birthday card. He won't be amused.

The birthday card produced by Hallmark bears the title "CSI: Topeka" and features a cartoon of two people standing over a corpse, with one saying, "Looks like he was bored to death."

Inside the card is the message, "Hope your birthday is anything but dull."

Though a company spokeswoman says Hallmark didn't intend to offend anyone, the mayor wasn't laughing when he learned about it.

"I find it offensive," Bunten told The Topeka Capital-Journal. "It's probably drawn up by somebody from West Virginia who hasn't been here."

Hallmark spokeswoman Kristi Ernsting said the author, whom she declined to identify, grew up in Kansas. The card refers to popular television dramas about forensics experts who investigate crimes, set in Las Vegas, Miami and New York.

"We hope that the people of Topeka can take it in good humor," she said. "That's how it was intended."

Richard Forester, president of the Topeka Convention and Visitors Bureau, expressed disappointment with the Kansas City, Mo.-based Hallmark, noting that it has a plant in Topeka.

But he added, "It's not the first time we've been poked fun at," he said, "and I'm sure it won't be the last."

Hey, You're No Teddy Bear

MANNING, S.C. (AP) — A warm teddy bear helped lead deputies to a man wanted for an armed robbery and carjacking.

Officers went to a home Wednesday night after received a tip that Gregory L. Mouzon was inside.

One of the investigators saw a pile of clothes in a closet and picked up a teddy bear on top that was unusually warm, Chief Deputy Joe Bradham said.

Other officers, including Investigator Tommy Burgess, started picking up the clothes and found Mouzon underneath the pile.

Mouzon "stuck his head up and said, 'Hello, Mr. Burgess,'" Bradham said.

Deputies had been looking for Mouzon for about 18 hours since he went into a gas station, robbed the clerk, then carjacked a 1996 Ford Taurus from an acquaintance who had driven him to the store, authorities said.

Thai Woman Wins Peruvian Prison Pageant

LIMA, Peru (AP) — It was an elegant beauty pageant lineup — especially for a Peruvian prison — where contestants showed poise on the catwalk and patience awaiting sentencing.

As an audience of Peruvian dignitaries applauded, a 24-year-old Thai woman was declared the winner of the annual Miss Spring contest at Santa Monica Women's Prison (search) in Lima.

Like many of her rivals in Thursday night's event, Onuma Chumsri was imprisoned for drug trafficking in Peru, the world's second largest producer of cocaine after Colombia. She is awaiting formal sentencing.

Prison officials said preparations for the contest started two months ago. Entrants were required to have good conduct, attend psychological therapy sessions and participate in some of the prison's permanent workshops, such as cosmetology, drawing and fabric painting.

"Sex appeal is important, but it is not as if we are seeking just the physical aspect, but rather the value as a woman, the value of the person is the essence of all of this," said Maria Jaen, director of the prison.

The prisoners themselves chose their representative of their cell areas. Of the 28 semifinalists, 11 women were picked for the final, including five foreigners from Thailand, Belgium, Bolivia and Mexico.

Of the more than 700 foreigners imprisoned in Peru, most were caught smuggling cocaine taped to their bodies, swallowed in plastic pouches or hidden in luggage.

Click in the photo box above to see some lovely ladies behind bars.

Compiled by FOXNews.com's Paul Wagenseil.

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