A volunteer rescue group from Texas traveled to Aruba to search for an American teen who disappeared during a trip to theCaribbean (search) island nearly four weeks ago.

The 24 volunteers, who include eight divers, arrived late Friday in the Dutch protectorate, bringing four dogs and sonar equipment with them. Tim Miller, director of Texas EquuSearch (search), said his team would start looking for Natalee Holloway (search) on Saturday morning.

"We are holding out hope that Natalee is alive, but we know the odds are against us," said Miller, adding that the group would remain in Aruba until it finds her.

The 18-year-old Alabama student went missing May 30, the last day of a five-day high school graduation trip with 124 other students. Her passport and packed suitcase were found in her hotel room. Police say they have thoroughly searched the island, assisted by residents and Dutch Marines.

Five men have been arrested in Holloway's disappearance, but no one has been charged. They include a Dutch teen and his father, who is a judge in training on the island.

Miller said athletes in the United States had approached him about helping with the search, but declined to say who they were or how they might participate.

Miller, who arrived ahead of his team, met with authorities Thursday to check where they had searched and plot new sites.

His first contact with police Superintendent Jan van der Straaten was "tense," but the two came to an agreement, he said, declining to elaborate.

Miller also would not say where the search would begin.

"If we find something that is evidence, we certainly don't want your cameras on it," Miller told reporters late Friday. He said the team would ask Arubans to help in the search within a few days.

Five men have been arrested in Holloway's disappearance, but no one has been charged. They include a Dutch teen and his father, who is a judge in training on the island.

Miller, whose team is based in Dickinson, Texas, said some of Holloway's relatives asked his group to undertake the search. He said his team might be successful because "we have the resources and equipment that hasn't been used in the ground or water."