They're on the government payroll, but some of President Bush's top aides have millions of dollars in stocks, real estate and other investments, according to financial disclosure forms released Wednesday.

Senior adviser Karl Rove (search) saw his stock and bond funds rise in value last year to between $1 million and $2.4 million. He also earned between $2,500 to $5,000 in rent on a house in Ingram, Texas, that is worth up to $250,000 and reported that his wife, Darby, owns a Florida beach house worth more than $1 million.

In 2003, Rove reported that his stock and bond funds were worth between $725,000 and $1.8 million.

White House chief of staff Andrew Card (search) has $1.2 million to $3.2 million invested in bank accounts, stock and bonds — up from $900,000 to $1.9 million last year. He also has homes in Maine and Massachusetts worth $350,000 to $750,000. Card, who has a long career in government, was a lobbyist for the auto industry in the 1990s.

Dan Bartlett (search), counselor to the president, has from $500,000 to $1.5 million in stock, bond and money market funds — up from $375,000 to $1 million the previous year. He also has land in Kerr, Texas, worth $15,000 to $50,000. Last year, he reported $375,000 to $1 million in stock, bond and money market funds.

Allan Hubbard, Bush's top economic adviser, reported between $5.7 million and $23.6 million in private equity holdings, limited liability companies and other business investments and $850,000 to $1.9 million in retirement accounts. He reported that his wife, Kathy, had $166,00 to $415,000 in investments. He listed $905,000 to $3.1 million in his children's assets.

Hubbard was a classmate of Bush's at Harvard Business School and became president of the Indianapolis-based E&A Industries chemical conglomerate before Bush appointed him as his adviser in January.

National security adviser Stephen Hadley, who also got his post after the election, listed assets held by him and his family worth between $3.3 million and $7.6 million. His holdings include money market accounts, CDs, investment funds, life insurance policies, a real estate partnership, retirement accounts and education funds.

Federal ethics laws require that financial information be reported only in broad ranges.