Evolution or intelligent design? Which theory should be taught in our children's schools? Or both? The state of Kansas is poised to set new public school standards requiring that Darwin's theory of evolution (search) be challenged in the classroom. Ohio took a similar step in 2002; lawmakers in Alabama and Georgia are trying to pass bills to at least allow teachers to challenge Darwin.

This debate dates back many years — remember the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial (search) in Tennessee? But this is 2005 — what do you think schools should teach about this? E-mail me at dayside@foxnews.com and I'll use some of your comments on the air during Monday's “DaySide.”

As for today's show, your e-mails are unanimously against people suing restaurants for making them obese: Not one of you voted in favor of the lawyer promoting these lawsuits! All the comments ran along a similar theme, but this was one that stood out:

I am overweight, but not obese. It is not the restaurant owner's fault that I am overweight. It is my problem because I don't exercise self-control with what I put into my mouth and I don't physically exercise... We are a 'sue happy' people..!
—Patty Adkins, Duncan, Oklahoma

Finally, a word about out tribute to military moms for Mother's Day. Many of you heard the letter I read on the air and asked for a copy. Here it is, in full:

People who don't have children in a war zone cannot fully understand what we go through every second of every day. Our life is no longer what we used to consider normal. Now normal is watching TV news and flipping back and forth between CNN and FOX. Having the radio AND TV on so you don't miss anything. It's reading the paper for any details; it's seeing something in a store that makes you cry, or having someone say, "How are you?" and it brings you to tears. It's checking your e-mail at 2, 4, 5, 6 a.m. just in case....
It's seeing the flag and knowing that is the symbol of America that is sewn on the soldiers' uniforms, the symbol they are making a stand for. It's tying yellow ribbons to anything that will stand still. It's wearing the picture of your son over your heart and you reach up and touch it without even being aware of it. And you pray. And you remember the little boy who you would not even allow to cross the street by himself. And you pray.
That is our "normal." When the soldiers return, they will never be the same. But neither will we.
We will have grown and found strength within us that we never knew we had. And we have made the best of friends with others who carry a piece of our heart in theirs.
—Laurel A. Olmsted

And by the way, Happy Mother's Day to all the moms in our military too.

Linda

Watch "DaySide with Linda Vester" weekdays at 1 p.m. ET

Send your comments to dayside@foxnews.com.