So we've gone farther with the weapons of mass destruction (search) investigation than the now months-old Duelfer report, which revealed there are no WMD in Iraq now and probably weren't at the outbreak of the Iraq war. Duelfer did allow for the possibility that WMD were spirited out of Iraq and may be buried in Syria or somewhere such as that.

Now comes the Silberman Robb report, commissioned by President Bush, which has now said that the pre-war intelligence on WMD in Iraq was "dead wrong."

So now we have Nancy Pelosi and John Kerry and Harry Reid and those types wanting hearings on how the president used wrong information to lead us into war.

First, do we not like the results of the war? Yes, we do. Do we think these results could have been achieved without the war? Don't make me laugh, but not a chance.

So, once again we have anti-war Democrats denouncing a successful war that accomplished what it set out to accomplish. And we have a president who is unhappy that intelligence was faulty, that he could not know for certain WMD were not in Iraq, and he was left to make a prudent decision on what turned out to be faulty information.

So we're going to have hearings on why the president didn't know information that was dead wrong was dead wrong? If the information was "dead wrong" — let's recall George Tenet's slam-dunk line — how was the president supposed to know?

If the intelligence that seemed to show a threat from a guy we knew was malevolent and, in fact, an overall threat, and if that intelligence later turned out to be wrong because he ran a government of murder and thuggery and fear and we couldn't get spies in there — then how is that Bush's fault?

Ladies and gentlemen, we are about to enter the noise-without-meaning phase of political debate on the war.

Wait a minute. That's wrong. We've been in the noise-without-meaning phase for years now. And evidently the carping is just now going to cease no matter how "dead wrong" it is.

That's My Word.

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