Tim Green (search) says he's just as excited about hosting the new version of "A Current Affair" (search) as he was nearly 20 years ago when he was a rookie trying to break into the NFL.

But he admits there's one big difference:

"Now, nobody is trying to trying to knock my head off," said Green. "There's nothing scary about this. It's all fun."

Green became a star defensive end with the Atlanta Falcons (search), playing from 1986 through 1994.

He said he expects the same level of success — if not more — hosting the weeknight TV magazine show, particularly because of the strong team behind him.

"I feel kind of like Peyton Manning," he said. "I have Edgerrin James to hand off to, and Marvin Harrison to throw to, and a great offensive line. The whole group is just talented and very hardworking."

Green — the valedictorian-turned-NFL-star-turned-Fox-NFL-analyst-turned-lawyer, and oh, yeah, he's also a best-selling author — expects to avoid opening-day jitters when the first episode of the syndicated show airs Monday night.

Twentieth Television, the syndication arm of News Corp.'s Fox television empire, is reviving the newsmagazine. It will air Monday through Friday at 6:30 p.m. EST.

The original "A Current Affair," hosted by Maury Povich (search) and a slew of successors, aired from 1986 through 1996 and is the original "tabloid TV" show.

The new version has brought together four of its original producers: Peter Brennan, Ian Rae, Bob Young and John Tomlin.

Green said that while the original show "set a pretty high standard," he expects the new version to be even harder hitting, gripping and compelling.

He especially wants the show to capture "the full range of human drama, from the tragic to the absurd."

One story in the works that Green is excited about involves Jermaine Yewell, who was the victim of a senseless hate crime as a Long Island kid in the early 1990s.

Yewell was beaten to a pulp, given little chance to live and no chance of fully recovering. Now, he's in California trying out for the Arena Football League.

"That's the type of human-drama stories we intend to do," said Green.

Besides TV and the football field, Green has excelled as a writer. His latest book, "Exact Revenge," a modern-day "The Count of Monte Cristo" set in New York, is ready to hit the stores in May.