Trivia from this year's Oscar nominations:

-- Four out of the five best actor nominees and three out of the five best actress nominees portrayed real-life characters. Cate Blanchett is nominated for portraying actress Katharine Hepburn, who herself won an Oscar for portraying real-life character Eleanor of Aquitaine in the 1968 film "The Lion in Winter."

-- Ten of the 19 actors nominated for their performances are first-time nominees. Johnny Depp is the only repeat acting nominee from 2003. Only one of the nominees, Hilary Swank, has previously won an acting Oscar.

-- Jamie Foxx is the 10th person to be nominated in both acting categories in the same year. The last person to be doubly nominated was Julianne Moore in 2002, although she did not win in either category. No person has ever won in both categories in the same year.

-- It was the best year ever for black performers, who had five of the 20 acting nominations. The most previously was three, including the 2001 Oscars when Halle Berry and Denzel Washington both won the lead acting prizes.

-- Boxing movies have frequently produced Oscar-nominated performances, although Hilary Swank is the first female to be nominated for portraying a pugilist. Notable nominees have included Wallace Beery in "The Champ," Sylvester Stallone for "Rocky," and Marlon Brando in "On the Waterfront."

-- Catalina Sandino Moreno's performance in "Maria Full of Grace" is in Spanish. Four performers have won Academy Awards for roles in languages other than English. The latest was Benicio Del Toro, who won the Oscar for best supporting actor for "Traffic" in 2000. Others include Roberto Benigni, best actor in 1998's "Life is Beautiful," Robert DeNiro, best supporting actor in 1974's "The Godfather Part II," and Sophia Loren, best actress in 1961's "Two Women."

-- John Williams' 43rd nomination, for composing the score of "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban," ties Alfred Newman's record in that music category. Williams is up against Newman's son, Thomas, who is nominated for composing the score of "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events."

-- The five nominees for best picture were all released in the last three months of 2004, continuing the tradition of nominated movies released late in the year. Notable exceptions include best picture winners "Gladiator," released in May 2000, and "The Silence of the Lambs," released in February 1991.