Nov. 23, 2004 3:23 p.m.
Baghdad

Just killed a fly on my producer's hat. It was an APTN baseball cap, which he should not have on anyway. He stood there and took it. The flies are faster and thinner in the winter, harder to catch. I asked for some flypaper to be sent over from New York. I asked Buonincontri to send it. She was the woman who got a copy of Kenny Rogers' "Lucille" to me and Slim Fagen in remote Northern Afghanistan. You can ask for anything in a war zone. She's very thorough. I asked for flypaper and she asked what kind of flies, which threw me off. I went with housefly. Iraqi fly paper doesn't hold the flies — not enough stick. They land, eat the sticky stuff, and fly off. So instead of killing them it only nourishes them.

When you open a window, flies come in. I've got a couple now in my bathroom that I swat at with a towel, but they are holding out.

Iraqi flyswatters, too, leave a lot to be desired. They are brittle plastic and often shatter after a brutal swat. I'm usually left with just a jagged tip and the handle by the end of the day. Plus, in the mesh of the killing zone there is a happy smiling face in the brightly colored plastic, utterly inappropriate on an instrument of death.

I can see bloodmarks still on the terminal to my left, where I got one yesterday. I kill them where they land, even if it be my leg or a producer's hat, because you don't know when you are going to get a second chance. I used to leave the corpses on David Lee Miller's keyboard, like a cat bringing home a bird, which would appall and baffle him. I don't think he knew who was behind it.

[ed. note: Steve Harrigan brings you a special four-part investigative series: "Eurabia." Tune in to "FOX Report with Shepard Smith" TONIGHT at 7 pm ET for PART 2. Click the video tab in the upper right to watch each segment as it airs. Plus, watch Harrigan's EXCLUSIVE answers to your questions about the series.]

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Steve Harrigan currently serves as a Miami-based correspondent for Fox News Channel (FNC). He joined the network in 2001 as a Moscow-based correspondent.