Instant analysis after the vice presidential debate (search) Tuesday night concluded that Vice President Dick Cheney won the first half of the meeting, on foreign policy, while North Carolina Sen. John Edwards tipped the scales for Democrats on domestic issues.

The largely civilized and somewhat dry debate at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio, did have a few zingers off which points were scored. Cheney said Edwards and Sen. John Kerry went from supporting the war in Iraq (search) to opposing it late last year when they each were losing in Democratic presidential primary polls to former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean (search), who opposed action in Iraq.

Clash in Cleveland: Who was the VP victor?

A sample of your responses:

Edwards clearly won. Cheney couldn't defend himself on the issue of doing business with rogue nations. He had no defense for voting against more weapon systems than Sen. Kerry. The V.P. refused to address the realities of Afghanistan and Iraq. Cheney was totally lost when Sen. Edwards mentioned the Vice President's history of siding with the insurance companies and drug companies at the expense of working class people. By the way. How many times did Cheney pass on answering a followup?
Joe K.
San Antonio, TX

While I agree with Tony Snow's conclusion that VP Cheney won the debate and it was much like a father coaching his son, I also think that one of the good points made by Sen. Edwards is that people DO see only the bad stuff about Iraq on TV! Even FOX, which is supposedly so fair and balanced, shows only the bad stuff...the bombings, the beheadings, etc.
Cindy E.
Canton, GA

It drove me up the wall the way that Edwards kept referring back to previous questions instead of directly answering the question of the moment. I think that Gwen Ifil would have done a better job had she told Edwards to stay on point. All things considered V.P. Cheney, I think, won the debate (including the domestic issue segment) but Edwards handled himself well.
Julie P.
Thibodaux, LA

The "charm" points go to Edwards,but VP Cheney clearly outclassed the Senator on content, stability, and knowledge. VP Cheney's realistic approach is a winner.
Ty H.
Norman, OK

Dick Cheney was superb and I couldn't have been more impressed! He just did an absolutely superb job of showing why President Bush should be re-elected and he sent John Edwards off looking totally befuddled!
Gail O.
Kalamazoo, MI

No question, Senator Edwards won over V.P. Cheney in their debate (two for two for the Democrats!) Senator Edwards was TRUTHFUL (see P.M. Ayad Allawi's remarks about the instability in Iraq -- he admits that things are going badly and he is worried)... see the job report today (down, DOWN, DOWN), etc. Sorry, we can not say that President Bush, nor V.P. Cheney have been truthful with anyone -- especially with the American people. SHAME on leaders who can not/will not admit to/see their mistakes and try to remedy them. It bodes poorly and worrisome for us - American citizens.
Jacqueline and Martin L.
Parkland, FL

Edwards next to Cheney looked like a little yappy terrier trying to bother a doberman... and the doberman just wanted to bat away the annoying pesky terrier who didn't know better.
Jeff V.
Kennesaw, GA

Cheney made a stong appearance. I think Edwards drank a lot of water to give his clinched fist a break. I wonder if his fingernails were digging into his palm? Maybe he should have gone for a manicure, like Kerry did before his debate with President Bush.
Butch O.
Wantage, NJ

I was proud of VP Cheney last night and feel that he won the debate. He showed wisdom, graciousness, and experience. Edwards showed boldness and good manipulation of the conversation, which can be accredited to his trial lawyer experience. To me, he also appeared cocky, unwise, and like a giddy school girl who has been given the opportunity of a life time, thinking she's going to show the world her talent.
Sharon G.
Houston, TX

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