Hurricane Karl (search) weakened slightly Tuesday and stayed on a course in the open ocean that only threatened ships, while Tropical Storm Lisa (search) became stronger far out in the Atlantic.

Karl, the seventh hurricane this season, had top sustained winds near 125 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center (search) in Miami. Forecasters expected it to weaken over the next day.

At 11 a.m. EDT, Karl was centered about 1,005 miles east-northeast of the northern Leeward Islands in the Caribbean and was moving north-northwest near 14 mph.

Karl followed Hurricane Jeanne, which was northeast of the Bahamas and moving east-southeast at 7 mph, but did not immediately threaten any land. Jeanne was blamed for at least 622 deaths in Haiti, where it hit as a tropical storm and caused flooding.

At 11 a.m., Lisa had top sustained winds near 70 mph, just below the 74 mph threshold to become a hurricane. Forecasters said Lisa was a small storm and its wind speed was expected to fluctuate.

The 12th named storm of the season was centered about 1,695 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands and was moving west-northwest near 10 mph.

Residents in the Caribbean should monitor Lisa, which was heading in their direction although it was still about a week away, forecasters said.

The hurricane season ends Nov. 30.