FNC
Col. David Hunt
We caught up with Col. Hunt to get his reaction to Mansoor Ijaz's piece:

 I think Mansoor is right on the money, so nothing to add there. However, here are some thoughts: During the Kennedy years, the White House staff consisted of some 62 members. Care to guess the size of the Bush White House staff? Over 2,000. Now this is not just a political observation, as every administration has had outrageously large staffs. Here is why it is important: terrorism.

We are fighting bad people who pass information on camels and horseback. Terrorists like al-Qaeda, on the other hand, have flat organizations with little bureaucracy. They operate in cells, which are small groups who have general instructions. They take years to plan and use our openness to kill us. We cannot fight this type of enemy with a bureaucracy that exceeds the number of some countries' military.

 "We are an elephant fighting sharks. We are out of our element
and too slow."

Here is an example: Between President Bush and say a soldier in Iraq, there are between 5,000 and 10,000 staff officers—not fighters mind you, but staff officers. How can we expect to do anything well with that kind of overhead? These are all good people. But come on, let's get real. We are an elephant fighting sharks. We are out of our element and too slow.

We must cut back on the levels of staffing involved in this fight—streamline, focus and commit. We seem to have forgotten about 9/11. The President is clearly leading, but his bureaucracy is in the way. The three-star general in Iraq has a 1,000-man staff or more supporting him. Centcom has twice that. The Pentagon has over 25,000. The shear numbers cry out to be cut. Cutting a bureaucracy is not easy, but since 9/11 it has become literally a matter of life and death.

Colonel David Hunt has over 29 years of military experience including extensive operational experience in Special Operations, Counterterrorism and Intelligence Operations. He served as Tactical Advisor in Bosnia where he facilitated all national intelligence matters for the Commander in Chief. Prior to this, he served as counterterrorism coordinator to the Summer Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea. He has served as a security advisor for the Federal Bureau of Investigation as well as state and local police officials,and is a graduate of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.