FOX Foreign Affairs Analyst Mansoor Ijaz disagrees with Dr. Walsh's assessment that "no country is likely to provide WMD to Iraqi-based terrorists." Read his response:

Dr. Walsh raises an interesting and historically correct point about why states have chosen, until now, not to transfer WMD technology to terrorist groups. However, that historical perspective does not take into account the change in how terrorist movements have morphed from hire-for-ransom organizations to ideologically driven enterprises aimed at radically transforming the way we live our lives.

For example, Hezbollah, the Iranian-backed militant organization, was just another terrorist group trying to wreak havoc on Israel as a political-military arm of the Iranian government prior to eptember 11, 2001. But today, with its al-Qaeda overlay and a global network of loosely affiliated but ideologically similar cells, it has morphed into a much more dangerous arm of the Iranian government.

"When states realize they are effectively being contained ...  they have no choice but to turn to terrorist organizations to do their dirty work for them."

And that is precisely the point about America's post-September 11th anti-terror efforts. When states realize they are effectively being contained by the international community, led by the US, in purveying terror as a part of their foreign policy, they have no choice but to turn to terrorist organizations to do their dirty work for them. It is naive to think Iran is any different.

Iran's clerics control the most sensitive organs of government(military, intelligence, police forces). This gives them unprecedented power to continue inappropriate policies, such as the harboring of al-Qaeda's senior leadership structure today as a Get-Out-of-Jail-Free card against any potential US-led attack on its nuclear facilities. Iran's clerics have also cut political deals with neighboring countries, like Saudi Arabia, using terrorism as a negotiating tool (or intimidation threat, depending on your point of view). They continue to pursue uranium enrichment while further dividing Europe and the United States politically with unilateral and as yet unverifiable offers to the European Union to stop producing nuclear bomb fuels. Yet Iran makes no commitment to dismantle nuclear weapons design and development programs.

Hypocrisy is no basis for constructive engagement with any country, and certainly not with countries that openly and clandestinely support terrorism as instruments of state policy.

Mansoor Ijaz is a FOX News Channel foreign affairs and terrorism analyst and founder and chairman of The Crescent Partnerships, a series of New York-based private equity partnerships focused exclusively on the development of national security technologies.

As a private American citizen, Ijaz negotiated Sudan’s counterterrorism offer to the Clinton administration in April 1997 and proposed the framework for a cease-fire of hostilities in Kashmir between Indian security forces and Muslim separatists in August 2000.