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Facts About Danbury Women's Prison

A federal judge on Friday sentenced celebrity homemaker Martha Stewart (search) to five months in prison, although her surrender to authorities was delayed to allow her attorneys to appeal.

If Stewart does serve time for lying about a stock sale, the judge recommended she be sent to the Danbury Federal Correctional Institution (search) in Connecticut — but it is up to the Bureau of Prisons to determine the location.

The following are some facts about the Danbury women's prison.

— The prison is split into two areas: a minimum security camp for inmates convicted of non-violent crimes and who present a low risk of flight, and an adjacent low security facility for women convicted of more serious offenses or who have longer criminal histories. The minimum security camp houses about 200 women, while the low security prison counts more than 1,200 inmates.

— Most of the inmates — 61.5 percent at the camp and 64 percent at the main facility — were convicted of drug offenses.

— All inmates work 7-1/2 hours a day and earn between 12 and 40 cents an hour. Chores can include cooking and serving food, cleaning the kitchen, doing laundry, mowing the grounds and plumbing.

— Inmates wear khaki pants and tops.

— Previous inmates include hotel magnate Leona Helmsley, convicted of tax evasion, and Caryl Hartjes, a Catholic nun convicted of trespass during a protest demonstration.

—The median age at the camp is 38 and the median prison term is 37 months.

— Inmates are allowed to sit next to visitors in a special room without being separated by barriers.

Stewart could also be sent to the minimum security prison camp in Alderson, W.Va, which has more than 1,000 inmates. Most of the women at that facility are also drug offenders and they perform similar work as those at Danbury.