Democrat Dennis Kucinich (search) has only two delegates and low single-digit showings after nine nominating contests, yet he said Wednesday he's staying in the presidential race.

"The race for the nomination will go all the way to the convention," Kucinich said in a statement. "It is at the convention where I will win the nomination, based on the emergence of Iraq as the defining issue."

In the seven states that voted Tuesday, Kucinich finished with no more than 5 percent of the vote and none of the 269 pledged delegates at stake. A candidate needs 2,162 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

Kucinich was spending the rest of this week in Washington state, Michigan and Maine, where Democrats will caucus on Saturday and Sunday. He planned to stump next week in New York, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia, Ohio, Nevada, California and Wisconsin.

Kucinich, an Ohio congressman who also faces re-election to his Cleveland-area seat, said he would stay in the race because he's the only candidate with a plan to get U.S. troops out of Iraq.

"Incredibly, you have Bush running for re-election on Iraq, which is the very issue that I can defeat him on," he told The Associated Press in an interview Wednesday.

Kucinich said he stands apart from his rivals because he has repeatedly called on the Bush administration to prove that deposed Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein (search) had weapons of mass destruction.

Former CIA weapons inspector David Kay (search) recently said he doubted that Saddam ever possessed such weapons. Bush agreed this week to name an independent commission to investigate the intelligence used to go to war.

"We have a president who is saying he wants to get the facts and yet he sent people to war without the facts and we have Democratic front-runners who said they were misled and yet they sent people to war," Kucinich said. "Where's the accountability?"