Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Lieberman (search) said endorsements Sunday from three newspapers in the South and Northwest show he's the candidate with national support.

But that has yet to be borne out by national and state polls, which show the Connecticut senator in single digits and well behind most of his six rivals for the Democratic nomination.

Lieberman skipped the Iowa caucuses and finished fifth in the New Hampshire primary. He has spent considerable time and resources on some of the seven states with primaries or caucuses on Tuesday, including Delaware, Oklahoma and South Carolina, where a victory could keep his campaign alive.

He was endorsed Sunday by two newspapers in South Carolina — The State, the largest newspaper there, and the Greenville News — along with the Seattle Times.

After preaching a gospel of shared values to about 300 members of the New Destiny Fellowship, a black Protestant congregation in Wilmington, Del., Lieberman said he was encouraged by the endorsements. The Arizona Republic also backed Lieberman last week.

"What this says is that I have national support," Lieberman told reporters on his fifth campaign stop in the state. "I'm the Democrat who can bring people together and win the election and actually get something done. That's the appeal I make to the voters here in Delaware and the six other states."

Before the church service, Lieberman worked the breakfast crowd at Jimmy's Restaurant in Wilmington. He was capping the day in Oklahoma, meeting voters and watching the Super Bowl.

Dean's Sunday schedule had him in Wisconsin and Michigan. In Milwaukee, he met privately with black leaders, then spoke at the Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ. President Bush visited the same church in July.

Dean touted his record on health care and his position on affirmative action, but avoided a critique of his rivals in favor of a more agreeable tone at the church.

"I am blessed, I am grateful and I thank you," he said. "Praise the Lord."