The chief of Israel's Mossad secret service agency traveled to Turkey this week to offer anti-terror expertise after suicide bombings in Istanbul killed at least 50 people, an Israeli TV station reported Friday.

Mossad (search) chief Meir Dagan (search) shared with Turkish officials Israel's experience in dealing with suicide bombings in three years of fighting with Palestinians, Channel Two TV reported. The report did not give an exact date for Dagan's trip or say how long he stayed.

The trip was part of an Israeli campaign to make countries around the world understand that terror is not just an Israeli problem and every country should work to stop it, the TV said.

An official from Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's office, which oversees the Mossad, would not comment on the report.

During three years of Israeli-Palestinian fighting, suicide bombers have killed 436 people.

Senior security officials in Israel refused to comment this week when asked if the two countries were cooperating in efforts to fight terrorism. But they claimed to know who was behind the bombings and said they were connected to Al Qaeda.

Turkish and U.S. authorities have also pointed blame at Al Qaeda for the bombings Thursday at the British consulate and a London-based bank and two other attacks on Nov. 15 at synagogues in the city.

After the attacks, Israel sent a rescue team for the synagogue bombings and offered to send blood donations. Much of the sympathy in Israel stems from the belief that Turkey was targeted due to its ties with Israel, which are based on a broad military agreement signed in 1996.