And now the most captivating two minutes in television, the latest from the wartime grapevine:

Colin Going to Court?

An American couple living in Israel says the State Department is ignoring the law by refusing to identify their infant son as being from Jerusalem, Israel.

Last year Congress passed a law that said U.S. citizens born in Jerusalem can choose to have Israel listed as their country of birth, but U.S. policy does not formally recognize Jerusalem as a part of Israel because that's a matter still under negotiation.

So Ari Zivotofsky and his wife, citing the law, have now sued Secretary of State Colin Powell (search), insisting Powell should be ordered to designate "Jerusalem, Israel" as their son's birthplace.

Clinton vs. Bush in 2004?

CNN has never pretended that the regulars on its Crossfire political debate show were neutral, but it has long pitted two conservative journalists, Robert Novak and Tucker Carlson, against two Democratic Party operatives, James Carville and Paul Begala.

And now Carville and Begala are doing more for the Democrats than sticking up for them on television. The two CNN personalities are now soliciting money for the party as well, and in a new mass e-mailing the dynamic duo says that donations are needed to highlight Bush's, "failed record," adding that, "As Bush's lies continue to unravel, his poll numbers have been plummeting.

One recent poll shows that if the election were held today, an unnamed Democrat could beat George W. Bush. America has finally had enough."

A new poll out, however, shows that when the democratic challenger is given a name, quite a different picture emerges. The Quinnipiac Poll (search) shows that in a head-to-head challenge, Bush beats any named Democrat, including New York Senator Hillary Clinton by 10 percentage points.

Even so, if she got into the race, 45 percent of Democrats say they would like to see her as their party's candidate, followed by Howard Dean, whose support sags to 9 percent with Hillary in the race.

Confederate Mascot in 2003?

A mostly African American high school in Illinois is objecting to playing one of its neighbors because the mostly white school nearby…whose mascot is a confederate soldier…has made a tradition of carrying a confederate flag onto the field after each of its touchdowns.

The neighboring school, Stronghurst Southern, agreed to forgo the tradition for the game against mostly black Longwood. But Longwood say Stronghurst fans might miss the flag and make comments that could lead to a tense situation, so they forfeited the game.

— FOX News' Michael Levine contributed to this report

With more than 35 years of journalism experience to draw from, Brit Hume currently serves as a senior political analyst for FOX News Channel (FNC) and contributes to all major political coverage. Hume also is regular panelist on FOX's weekly public affairs program, "FOX News Sunday" on Sundays at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. ET. Click here for more information on Brit Hume