Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger (search) plans to announce today whether he will join the list of candidates hoping to replace him Gray Davis (search) as governor of California. After the announcement, Schwarzenegger will appear on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" to discuss it.

Meanwhile, Gov. Gray Davis got a boost from one of the nation's most powerful labor groups as the AFL-CIO on Tuesday called on Californians to oppose the Oct. 7 recall and urged Davis' fellow Democrats to keep their names off the ballot.

"We call on all state leaders in the Democratic Party to stand united with the governor and stay off the recall ballot," according to a resolution adopted by the AFL-CIO (search) Executive Council.

The vote in Chicago came a day after California's AFL-CIO sent a letter to state Democrats with the same message.

It was a crucial victory for Davis, who believes keeping the name of any prominent Democrat off the Oct. 7 recall ballot will reduce the chances of his being recalled.

The labor backing comes amid crumbling public support from Davis' fellow party members. Some have called for a strong candidate on the two-part ballot to ensure the governorship remains in Democratic hands if Davis is recalled.

Several have mentioned Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the state's most popular Democrat, but Feinstein has said she does not intend to run.

State Sen. Tom McClintock of Thousand Oaks filed his candidacy papers Tuesday. Rep. Darrell Issa, who bankrolled the recall drive, has said he will be a candidate.

Former Mayor Richard Riordan has said he will consider running if Schwarzenegger doesn't.

Former congressman and U.S. Senate candidate Michael Huffington is considering a run, and The Washington Post reported Wednesday that Huffington's ex-wife, columnist Arianna Huffington, will announce her candidacy on Wednesday's "Today" show.

The deadline for candidates to file candidacy papers is 5 p.m. Saturday.

Not all unions have taken the AFL-CIO's stance. The California Correctional Peace Officers Association (search), the 31,000-member prison guards union that has traditionally been one of Davis' top supporters and donors, is staying neutral for now, Executive Vice President Lance Corcoran said Tuesday.

"We've been a longtime supporter of Gov. Davis. At this particular time we're waiting, like many others, to make any endorsement," Corcoran said.