Half of Americans say they are concerned that weapons of mass destruction (search) will never be found in Iraq, but even if the weapons are not found, a sizable majority thinks the war with Iraq was justified.

Back in February, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell (search) presented evidence gathered by the U.S. intelligence community to the United Nations Security Council (search) that was intended to prove Iraq was in violation of U.N. weapons resolutions.

The latest FOX News poll finds that a 41-percent plurality thinks U.S. prewar intelligence on Iraq’s weapons was "intentionally misleading," while about a quarter (26 percent) think the officials simply got it "wrong." Another 18 percent think the truth about the weapons intel lies somewhere between a mistake and an intentional deception.

Even so, 69 percent of the public thinks the war with Iraq was justified without ever finding the banned weapons, and 76 percent say they are more likely to believe the missing weapons have been destroyed or moved rather than that there were no weapons at all (16 percent). Two weeks ago, 82 percent believed the weapons had been moved or destroyed and 10 percent thought there never were any.

"The Bush administration is lucky that, at least so far, the American people seem to be taking the failure to find weapons of mass destruction less seriously than the press and people in other countries are taking it," comments Opinion Dynamics President John Gorman. "While Tony Blair (search) seems to be in some real political danger from this failure, Americans seem to be giving the administration a pass, even as many of them say they have been misled about the facts."

By almost two-to-one, Americans think it’s time to forgive France and restore that friendship (61 percent) rather than remain distant (33 percent) because of their opposition to the U.S. military action against Iraq.

The new poll, which was conducted June 3-4 by Opinion Dynamics Corporation, also shows that many Americans think the United States and its allies are winning the war against terrorism.
Today, 57 percent think the United States is winning the war on terror, up from 37 percent the last time the question was posed in November 2002. Men are somewhat more likely than women to say the U.S. is winning (61 percent and 53 percent respectively), but the largest difference of opinion, not surprisingly, comes between the political parties.

Republicans are one-and-a-half times more likely than Democrats to say the U.S. is winning (74 percent to 47 percent), and those who approve of the job President Bush is doing are more than three times more likely than those who disapprove to say the U.S. is winning (72 percent to 22 percent).

Today, around half of the public (51 percent) think the government’s color-coded terror alert system is helpful (38 percent "not helpful"). While these findings are similar to those from earlier this year, they show a marked increased from late 2002 when the alert system had been in place about eight months. In November 2002, the public was divided on the helpfulness of the system, with 39 percent saying it was and 41 percent saying it was not helpful.

If Iran is proven to be aiding terrorist groups, a majority (61 percent) supports taking military action against that country, including 57 percent of women and 51 percent of Democrats.

Is Peace Possible?

Most Americans approve of President George W. Bush getting involved in Middle East peace negotiations, but remain skeptical that there will ever be peace in the region.

Fully 76 percent of the public approves of Bush taking a more active role in the negotiations, 18 percent disapprove. Earlier this week, the president attended a summit with Israel's Ariel Sharon (search) and Palestinian Mahmoud Abbas (search) and has publicly stated that he plans to stay involved. The meetings were held to discuss the "road map" to peace or Palestinian statehood.

However, only about a quarter of Americans (23 percent) think there will ever be peace in the Middle East.

Polling was conducted by telephone June 3-4, 2003 in the evenings. The sample is 900 registered voters nationwide with a margin of error of ±3 percentage points. Results are of registered voters, unless otherwise noted. 

1. As of right now, do you think the U.S. and its allies are winning the war against terrorism?

  Yes No (NS)
3-4 Jun 03 57% 29 14
19-20 Nov 02 37% 42 21
8-9 Sep 02 36% 43 21
28-29 Nov 01 67% 15 18
14-15 Nov 01 62% 18 20
17-18 Oct 01 47% 32 21

2. Do you approve or disapprove of the Bush administration's handling of postwar reconstruction in Iraq?

1. Approve 57%
2. Disapprove 31
3. (Don’t know) 12

3. Do you think there will ever be peace in the Middle East?

  Yes No (NS)
3-4 Jun 03 23% 69 8
12-13 Mar 02 17% 76 7
17-18 Sep 97 22% 72 6

4. Do you approve or disapprove of President Bush taking a more active role in the Middle East peace negotiations?

1. Approve 76%
2. Disapprove 18
3. (Not sure) 6

(for reference, 12-13 Mar 02) Do you favor or oppose the United States taking a more active role in the Middle East peace negotiations?

1. Favor 63%
2. Oppose 26
3. (Not sure) 11

5. In general, when history looks at the attempts of American presidents to take a direct role in Middle East peace negotiations, do you think it is more likely to conclude:

1. They were politically courageous to try to make peace or 59%
2. They were arrogant to assume they could affect the situation? 21
3. (Both) 7
4. (Neither) 4
5. (Not sure) 9

6. Even though France did not support the war in Iraq, do you think the United States should seek to restore a friendly relationship or remain distant?

1. Restore friendly relationship 61%
2. Remain distant 33
3. (Not sure) 6

7. So far, the United States has found mobile laboratories that might have been used to build weapons, but has not found any weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. Do you think this is more likely because the weapons have been moved or destroyed, or because there were no weapons in the first place?
SCALE: 1. Weapons have been moved or destroyed 2. Were no weapons in the first place3. (Not sure)

  Weapons moved/
destroyed
Were no weapons (Not sure)
3-4 Jun 03 76% 16 8
20-21 May 03 82% 10 8

8. How concerned are you that weapons of mass destruction will never be found in Iraq?

1. Very concerned 23%
2. Somewhat concerned 28
3. Not very concerned 23
4. Not at all concerned 22
5. (Not sure) 4

9. If weapons of mass destruction are never found in Iraq, do you think it is more likely that U.S. prewar intelligence was just wrong or that it was intentionally misleading?

1. Just wrong 26%
2. Intentionally misleading 41
3. (Somewhere in between) 18
4. (Not sure) 15

10. Do you believe the United States going to war with Iraq was justified even if weapons of mass destruction are never found?

1. Yes 69%
2. No 24
3. (Not justified even if find weapons) 1
4. (Not sure) 6

(for reference,8-9 Apr 03) Do you think the United States and coalition forces can declare victory even if weapons of mass destruction are never found?

1. Yes 62%
2. No 25
3. (Already found) 4
4. (Not sure) 9

11. Would you support or oppose the United States taking military action against Iran if it is proven that country is aiding terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda?

1. Support 61%
2. Oppose 29
3. (Not sure) 10

12. Do you think the government's color-coded terror alert system is helpful or not?

  Helpful Not helpful (Not sure)
3-4 Jun 03 51% 38 11
11-12 Feb 03 50% 37 13
19-20 Nov 02 39% 41 20