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Porn Stars Film Appreciative Video for Troops

Messages from professional athletes, rock stars and movie sirens have been broadcast to thank U.S. troops abroad. But now X-rated entertainers want to raise spirits as well.

Busting out of barely there outfits and grasping a disturbingly long microphone, porn actresses took turns having their messages to the troops taped at the recent Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas.

But their breathy benevolence may have been for naught.

The Armed Forces Radio and Television Services, which distributes programming to U.S. forces globally, has decided these broads won't be broadcast over its airways.

A spokesman for the military broadcast service said he has been ordered not to comment on the issue, but Scott Stein, director of marketing for Sin City Films said he is disappointed by the military's decision.

Adult entertainment has penetrated mainstream culture and should be included in broadcasts to the troops, he said.

"It's ridiculous that it's even an issue — these are Americans giving their greetings to the troops, not unlike an athlete or another actor," he said.

Stein conjured up the idea and collaborated with Adult Video News Magazine and The Erotic Network to produce the videotape.

"I remember seeing greetings to the troops and I thought, 'If there's any one industry that's aware of our freedoms living here, it's the adult film industry,' so I got a few companies involved," he said.

The porn-star greeting tape features about 30 actresses and is currently being edited to meet military broadcast service guidelines.

"We're going to go through the steps regardless and see if it's accepted," Stein said. "We just want to show our support just like any other industry."

There is no denying that gestures of support have helped boost morale. But would women who serve in uniform appreciate messages from women who work without uniforms?

"The adult industry is a billion-dollar industry and women are consumers too," Stein insists. "It's ridiculous to think adult material only appeals to men."

The refusal to air the adult-entertainment-star tape would not violate constitutional rights, according to Lynn Osborne, board chair of The Association for Women in Communications.

She said freedom of speech "does not mean that any broadcast company is obligated to air anything they do not see as appropriate for their viewing audience."

The viewing audience in this case is hard at work fighting the war on terror and certainly not tuning in for any more controversy.

"I don't think anyone would be offended by this," Stein said. "It's not like they are naked and having sex in the greetings — they are Americans saying thank you."