Zacarias Moussaoui, accused of conspiracy in the Sept. 11 attacks, says his judge is mentally ill, his former lawyers are bloodsuckers and Jews are his enemies.

He also says he wants his trial moved from Northern Virginia, near the Pentagon, to Colorado, where there are fewer government workers.

Moussaoui's handwritten motions, made public by U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema, combine religious references with quotations from the Constitution and court cases.

Granted the right to represent himself, Moussaoui said Brinkema "is suffering from post-traumatic mental disorder and she must be dismiss for her own mental interest."

"The curse of Allah is and will be on you," he wrote the judge on several occasions.

Describing himself as a "slave of Allah," Moussaoui said, "I am indeed a Muslim fundamentalist openly hostile to the Jew and the United States of America."

Moussaoui, a French citizen who often misspelled words and used poor grammar, called his now-dismissed legal team "a bunch of blood sucker, really discusting." He said the court-appointed team included a "wicked" public defender, a "nasty Jewish zealot" and a "right wing fascist."

In seeking to move his trial to Denver, Moussaoui argued the Colorado city is a "more neutral" location, that would "ensure a greater feeling of personal safety for the jury and ... reduce slightly the level of hostility."

He would have "a jury pool without over representation of loyal government employees," Moussaoui said, adding that "12 Talebans from Cuba" would be a fairer jury.

He also quoted from the Constitution's guarantees of a fair trial, and contended his case was brought to Northern Virginia "to ensure the death penalty."

The government said it would seek the death penalty for Moussaoui, the only individual indicted for an alleged role in the Sept. 11 attacks. He is charged with conspiring to commit terrorism, aircraft piracy, and destruction of aircraft, use weapons of mass destruction, murder U.S. government employees and destroy property.

Moussaoui is being held in near-total isolation at the Alexandria Detention Center. Brinkema on Tuesday turned down his request for immediate release, dropping all charges and a hearing to present evidence of his innocence.

Brinkema said Moussaoui "has not articulated any compelling reasons" for his pretrial release and could file motions — possibly using a new court-appointed lawyer — to pursue evidence that could help his case.