A summary of the 66 charges against former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic for alleged crimes in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo. He could be sentenced to up to life imprisonment if convicted of any single charge:

CROATIA:

For the 1991-1992 Croatian war, Milosevic faces 32 counts for "the forceable removal of the majority of the Croat and other non-Serb population from approximately one-third of the territory of the Republic of Croatia."

Forces under his command murdered hundreds of civilians, including women and the elderly, and forced out 170,000 Croat and non-Serb inhabitants, his indictment says.

Charges:

— Grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 (nine counts).

— Violations of the laws or customs of war (13 counts).

— Crimes against humanity (10 counts).

BOSNIA:

During the 1992-1995 Bosnian war, thousands of Muslims were rounded up and killed in fields near Srebrenica. Milosevic has been charged with genocide for planning the executions.

He also stands accused in the three-year siege of Sarajevo, when Serb snipers shot children, women and the elderly on the streets and in their homes.

Charges:

— Genocide and complicity in genocide (two counts).

— Crimes against humanity (10 counts).

— Grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 (8 counts).

— Violations of the laws or customs of war (nine counts).

KOSOVO:

In 1998-1999 Milosevic allegedly unleashed Serb forces in a brutal crackdown on ethnic Albanians in the Serbian province of Kosovo. More than a million civilians were forced from their homes, which were often looted and burned. Some 800,000 people were expelled and several hundreds of thousands internally displaced. Thousands were killed in village massacres across the province.

Charges:

— Violations of the laws and customs of war (one count)

— Crimes against humanity (four counts).