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Cricketers fight for foothold in baseball-mad Cuba
The Caribbean is divided between baseball-playing countries with U.S. ties and cricket-playing islands that once belonged to the British Empire. Nowhere is more baseball-crazy than Cuba, but even here, a tiny but passionate group of men is trying to win people over to cricket, baseball's slower-paced, more courtly British relative.
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In this Sept. 29, 2014 photo, Yordeni Caballeros, center, bats the ball while his friend Duani Rojas, right, and his coach Kiomai Aguiar, left, watch during a game of street cricket in the neighborhood of San Miguel del Padrón in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. The Caribbean is divided between baseball-playing countries with U.S. ties and cricket-playing islands that once belonged to the British Empire. Nowhere is more baseball-crazy than Cuba, but even here, a tiny but passionate group of men is trying to win people over to cricket (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 29, 2014 photo, coach Kiomai Aguiar, left, talks with children during a game of cricket in the neighborhood of San Miguel del Padrón in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. The offspring of immigrants from the island of Martinique, Aguiar said he played baseball and basketball as a child, then switched to cricket at 16, falling in love with its leisurely pace and courtly interactions between players. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 24, 2014 photo, a cricket player waits his turn to play next to a soccer ball in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Without a national tournament, Cuba has amateur tournaments between Cuban teams and teams of students from cricket-playing countries. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 27, 2014 photo, several players cheer their team on, while children with a soccer ball talk with a team member, during a cricket game between Cuban and South African students in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. According to an official of the National Sports Institute, Cuba has organized cricket in six of its 16 provinces, with 1,150 registered players throughout the country of 11 million. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 29, 2014 photo, from left, Duani Rojas, Yoendry Díaz, Daniel Ordani, Yordeni Caballeros, gather in the street to start a game of cricket in the neighborhood of San Miguel del Padrón in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Cubas cricket partisans subsist on homemade and donated equipment from the embassies of cricket-playing countries. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 27, 2014 photo, a cricket player waits for his turn to play during a game between Cuban and South African students in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Without a national tournament, Cuba has amateur tournaments like one played on a Havana soccer field between three Cuban teams and three teams of students from cricket-playing countries. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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In this Sept. 27, 2014 photo, a player of the Cuban team, left, walks off of the pitch while South African players celebrate during a cricket game between Cuban and South African players in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Cricket is most deeply rooted in the eastern province of Guantanamo, home to many of Cubas immigrant-founded communities, where cricket is frequently taught to children in after school athletics programs. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Cricketers fight for foothold in baseball-mad Cuba

The Caribbean is divided between baseball-playing countries with U.S. ties and cricket-playing islands that once belonged to the British Empire. Nowhere is more baseball-crazy than Cuba, but even here, a tiny but passionate group of men is trying to win people over to cricket, baseball's slower-paced, more courtly British relative.

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