NFL

Wednesday's Sports in Brief

BASEBALL

CHICAGO (AP) Next year is here.

At 11:47 local time, the Chicago Cubs won the World Series that has eluded them for 108 years, beating the Indians 8-7 at Cleveland in 10 innings. Fans who packed bars to watch the game on television near Wrigley Field - neither of which existed back in 1908 - erupted in cheers before swarming onto the streets just before midnight Wednesday to celebrate in the shadows of the statues of Cubs greats Ernie Banks, Billy Williams, Ron Santo and legendary announcer Harry Caray.

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As the game ended, the roar from inside the bars and the throng of fans on the street was deafening, before the crowds both inside and out sang ''go Cubs go'' at the top of their lungs.

As the celebration progressed, thousands of fans poured into the streets leading away from Wrigley, many of them singing ''We Are The Champions.''

PRO FOOTBALL

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - Panthers quarterback Cam Newton's concerns about ''illegal hits'' have been heard by the NFL - and action has been taken.

A person familiar with the situation says Arizona Cardinals defensive tackle Calais Campbell has been fined $18,000 for his hit on Newton in Sunday's game. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the league does not publicly announce fines.

Newton had a phone conversation with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Tuesday about his perspective on the hits he takes from defensive players while in the pocket.

Newton said after Sunday's game he didn't feel protected in the pocket after no flag was thrown when Campbell crashed into his legs as he was releasing the football.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Prosecutors and attorneys for the man accused of killing New Orleans Saints star Will Smith say they're ready for trial next month on charges including second-degree murder.

Lawyers said after a hearing that they expect about 100 potential jurors to be called to court Dec. 1 for the trial of Cardell Hayes, who shot Smith during a traffic altercation on April 9.

Prosecutors say Hayes provoked the confrontation by ramming his Hummer into Smith's SUV.

Defense lawyers say Smith was the aggressor and Hayes fired in self-defense as Smith went to get his own gun. They note that Hayes did not flee, and waited for police to arrive after the shooting.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Wide receiver Andre Johnson says his mother taught him when a person decides to take their leave they should exit the same way they entered, explaining why he quietly retired midway through his 14th NFL season.

Johnson thanked everyone for their texts, post and calls in a statement on Instagram, two days after telling Tennessee Titans coach Mike Mularkey he was retiring.

He also thanked his mother, an uncle, former Houston general manager Charley Casserly, the city of Miami and both the Colts and Titans.

Johnson wrote he is returning home to Houston where he ''will always be a Texan.''

He still is the leading receiver in Texans' history with 1,012 catches for 13,597 yards and 64 touchdowns.

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) - Minnesota Vikings coach Mike Zimmer is recovering from surgery to repair a torn retina in one of his eyes.

Wearing sunglasses to limit the outside light at his news conference next to the team's practice fields, Zimmer said he'd had vision trouble for a couple of days before scratching his eye during the game Monday in Chicago. He was sent for further examination and a procedure done Tuesday by doctors who warned him he risked blindness if he didn't address the problem.

Zimmer said he's been watching film with his good eye, using reading glasses so he can write down notes.

The Vikings play Sunday at home against Detroit.

BASEBALL

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The U.S. Department of Justice is suing AT&T because its DirecTV unit allegedly orchestrated a backroom deal with competitors to not carry the sole channel that broadcasts Dodgers baseball in Los Angeles.

The civil antitrust lawsuit filed in Los Angeles federal court accuses DirecTV of swapping information with cable companies Cox Communications Inc., Charter Communications Inc. and AT&T - before it acquired DirecTV - during negotiations to carry SportsNet LA, the network owned by the Dodgers.

The complaint says the companies made the agreements to prevent competitors from offering the channel to lure customers. Dodger fans were bitter they could only watch games through Time Warner Cable - now owned by Charter - the past three seasons.

The government says DirecTV was the ringleader because it was the only company that unlawfully talked to multiple rivals, and says that DirecTV executives acknowledged that the satellite-TV company would be in a stronger position if competing TV providers also did not carry the Dodgers channel.