OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) There were few indications before August that Russell Westbrook would be so willing to be the hero downtrodden Thunder fans needed.

For years, the sometimes combustible Westbrook toiled in Kevin Durant's shadow. He often was viewed as the talented, selfish player who was as likely to get in Durant's way as he was to make a winning play. His flashy style seemed at odds with small-market Oklahoma City so when Durant, who seemingly was a better fit in OKC, left for rival Golden State, fear that Westbrook would bolt for a larger market increased.

He didn't. He chose to re-sign with the Thunder and now that he has answered the call, it's time to deliver.

More from FoxSports

''We know a few things about Russell at this point,'' Thunder general manager Sam Presti said. ''He's going to bring his lunch pail every day. He's going to compete. He's going to inspire. He's going to show great conviction and courage to his teammates, to the city, to the organization. And from there, we have to figure out how that comes together.''

That trek begins Wednesday in Philadelphia when Oklahoma City officially tips off the post-Durant era in its season opener against the 76ers.

Westbrook is now the unquestioned leader of the Thunder and player folks behind the scenes knew - the thoughtful, humble, giving man - has more readily come to the surface. He has gone to great lengths to connect with Thunder fans in recent months.

Among other things, he unveiled his new line of True Religion clothing near downtown Oklahoma City and he attended an Oklahoma home football game against Louisiana-Monroe wearing a custom-made Sooners jersey. When he was introduced to the crowd before the Thunder's preseason home opener, he got the kinds of cheers normally reserved for a return from injury.

Westbrook seems more at ease on the court, too. His preseason play seemed more effortless than electric, with an occasional flourish.

''I want the team to play how they want to play,'' Westbrook said. ''I mean, it's not totally up to me how we play. You have to adjust to the team you have and adjust on a night-in, night-out basis on how you want to play. You want to play fast some nights and you want to play slow. I think it depends on the game, on the situation, who is on the floor.''

He is poised to put up astronomical numbers this season as he tries to keep the Thunder among the NBA elite.

Last season Westbrook averaged 23.5 points and career highs of 10.4 assists and 7.8 rebounds. He posted 18 triple-doubles, the most for a player since Magic Johnson had 18 during the 1981-82 season. The two-time All-Star MVP and former scoring champion could do more damage without Durant, but the Thunder don't want too much pressure on him.

''I think we have to be able to play in a way that's not just relying on him to do everything and create every single shot, whether it's him making the shot or making the play for another guy,'' Thunder forward Nick Collison said.

Westbrook already has left an impression on his new backcourt mate Victor Oladipo, who was acquired in the trade that sent defensive enforcer Serge Ibaka to Orlando.

''After working with Russ, I can see the intensity in how serious he was about his craft,'' Oladipo said. ''But one thing that I realized that after guarding him for three years - I can see why he's so effective at what he does. I definitely stole that from him, and I'm going to take it and run as fast as I can with it.''

How Oladipo and the rest of the Thunder do in keeping up with Russell will determine how much success the team will have. Oklahoma City is no longer considered the team to beat in championship conversations, and that's fine with Westbrook. He said the team embraces the underdog role.

''I love it,'' he said. ''I love it, man. I think it's a great challenge, not just for myself, but for our whole team. I think just from talking to the guys throughout the summer, they understand that. They want to win. They want to get better.''

---

Follow Cliff Brunt on Twitter (at)CliffBruntAP .