DERRICK ROSE LAWSUIT

LOS ANGELES (AP) NBA star Derrick Rose and two friends were cleared in a $21.5 million lawsuit that accused them of gang raping his ex-girlfriend when she was incapacitated from drugs or alcohol.

Jurors in Los Angeles federal court reached the verdict in less than four hours after concluding there was a lack of evidence to support the woman's claims and dismissing her account as unbelievable.

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Rose remained stoic as the verdict was read and later thanked jurors and posed for photos with them in the lobby, draping his left arm around each one who wanted a souvenir of the Knicks point guard as one of his lawyers snapped photos on their phones.

The case was X-rated at times with testimony from the men about poolside group sex at a mansion Rose rented in Beverly Hills in the summer of 2013 and multiple sexual encounters throughout the night and into the next morning.

BAYLOR SEXUAL ASSAULT INVESTIGATION

WACO, Texas (AP) - Baylor University is under federal investigation after its former Title IX coordinator filed a complaint over sexual violence on the university's Waco campus.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for the federal Office for Civil Rights said the investigation opened after the agency received a complaint from Patty Crawford, Baylor's former Title IX coordinator.

As Title IX coordinator, Crawford was entrusted with enforcing federal standards meant to prevent discrimination based on gender at Baylor.

Crawford resigned as Title IX coordinator early this month. She said publicly that top campus leaders undermined her efforts to investigate sexual assault claims and were more concerned with protecting the Baylor ''brand'' than the students.

Baylor has received a storm of criticism over claims it mishandled sexual assault cases for several years.

PENN STATE ABUSE

BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) - A former Penn State athletic director is denying a claim by a main witness against Jerry Sandusky that he was terminated as an assistant football coach because of his role in Sandusky's child molestation case.

Jurors in Mike McQueary's defamation and whistleblower lawsuit were read testimony by Dave Joyner.

McQueary's lawsuit claims he was mistreated by the university over his role as a witness against Sandusky. He's seeking more than $4 million in lost wages and other claims.

The school says he was put on paid leave after Sandusky's arrest over safety concerns, not in retaliation for his role in the case.

Sandusky maintains his innocence and is appealing.

Testimony resumes on Thursday, the fourth day of trial. McQueary is expected to take the stand in the coming days.

OLYMPICS

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Police say a fourth person has been charged in connection with the shooting death of Olympic sprinter Tyson Gay's 15-year-old daughter.

Lexington police said 20-year-old Lamonte A. Williams has been charged with wanton endangerment.

Witnesses told police that gunfire was exchanged between two vehicles early Sunday. Trinity Gay was hit by a round.

Three men charged with wanton endangerment previously pleaded not guilty Monday and face an Oct. 25 court date. They are 38-year-old Chazerae Taylor; his 19-year-old son, D'Markeo Taylor; and 21-year-old Dvonta Middlebrooks. Middlebrooks also is charged with possession of a firearm by a felon.

News media report the Taylors were released from jail Wednesday on $5,000 cash bond each.

Tyson Gay has said from talking with police that he believes his daughter was an innocent bystander.

PRO FOOTBALL

NEW YORK (AP) - The NFL will require the athletic trainer in the press box to stay in contact with on-field doctors to help determine if a player has a concussion.

The requirement is an enhancement made to prevent confusion that occurred in the season opener, when Carolina's Cam Newton was allowed to return after getting hit in the head.

Under the league's concussion protocol, the NFL's athletic trainer wasn't allowed to call a ''medical timeout'' after being contacted by personnel on the field. In Newton's case, the team physician and an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant asked the trainer for video of the hit, but a technology glitch delayed the video.

After getting the replay and observing Newton on the sideline, the physician and neurotrauma consultant said no further evaluation of the quarterback was necessary.

Under the new protocol, the trainer in the booth would be able to stay in contact with doctors on the field until receiving word that a concussion evaluation has occurred.