NFL

Colts' Dwayne Allen, mistaken as anthem protester, speaks out against hateful attacks

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - SEPTEMBER 11: Dwayne Allen #83 of the Indianapolis Colts reacts after a 19-yard touchdown reception against the Detroit Lions during the game at Lucas Oil Stadium on September 11, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Lions defeated the Colts 39-35. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - SEPTEMBER 11: Dwayne Allen #83 of the Indianapolis Colts reacts after a 19-yard touchdown reception against the Detroit Lions during the game at Lucas Oil Stadium on September 11, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Lions defeated the Colts 39-35. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Dwayne Allen has a pregame custom of taking a knee at the end of the national anthem and saying a prayer.

However, when the Indianapolis Colts tight end was spotted doing so Sunday, he became the target of angry fans who thought he was protesting the anthem.

That led current and former teammates to speak out in Allen's defense.

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Hold up! I just caught wind of this but @Dallen83 IS NOT &HAS NOT kneeled in protest, he always kneels in prayer so apologies are in order!

— ROBERT MATHIS The1st (@RobertMathis98) October 19, 2016

All Colts fans who had negative reaction to Dwayne Allen Sunday night should watch this. Know the real story! https://t.co/D1LBQ7In8f

— Tony Dungy (@TonyDungy) October 19, 2016

The team even released a video explaining Allen's actions and addressing the hateful comments he received.

For over 4 years, @Dallen83 has knelt in prayer at the end of the National Anthem for every game. Sunday was no different: pic.twitter.com/EMVM8P9aWP

— Indianapolis Colts (@Colts) October 19, 2016

And on Wednesday, Allen addressed his critics and had some outrage of his own.

"I was not protesting, I was praying," Allen told reporters. "Whether I was protesting or not, it doesn't give the right for others to use those words of hate. If you want to show patriotism, show patriotism, have pride about this great nation, show your love and devotion about this great nation. Don't use words of hate to try to show harm to someone else."

But Allen, who has been active in helping victims of domestic violence and won the Colts' man of the year award last season, also defended their right to speak out and acknowledged he would like to help them spread the message about inequality in America.

"I've wanted to shed the light on that issue and hopefully we as a great nation we can come to a place where we all say enough and we gather together and we say we do have the ability to show what true patriotism is and that's what we're going to do instead of sharing hate," Allen said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.