Coming into UFC 196, Conor McGregor had a plan.

It was a simple prescription: land overhand shots, test the chin, and if he had the chance, exploit Nate Dia's "overrated" jiu-jitsu before breaking him down piece by piece on the mat.

...Welp...

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Quite to the contrary, virtually every asset McGregor believed he had coming into his UFC 196 was turned around and employed against him to devastating effect.

In fact, McGregor described his downfall to Diaz during an interview with UFC reporter Megan Olivi days before stepping into the ring against Diaz. Move by move, McGregor explained each tactic that would fail him, and essentially narrated the exact manner in which he'd be broken down and submitted by his opponent.

McGregor's plan, as he initially laid them out:

"I feel the heel will be a dangerous weapon. The front of the foot, the shin...the uppercuts...the overhands...the body...I will butcher his soft frame. I also would like to dominate him on the mat. I think his jiu-jitsu is overrated. I think he has no positional dominance...no positional understanding at all...he will abandon position and end up on his back or end up in a scramble. So I feel like if he is still conscious when he hits the deck, I will crush his hips, pass his guard and mount him. And then either pound him out or choke."

Let's parse this:

"I feel the heel will be a dangerous weapon."

"The overhands."

"I will crush his hips, pass his guard and mount him. And then either pound him out or choke."

Yeah, that didn't exactly pan out. You can see a perfect, video-to-interview narration of McGregor's ironic statements here.

Sometimes you have to eat your words. And sometimes those words fed to you with extreme prejudice.

Dan is on Twitter. Hip-crushing seems like a top five thing you don't want to happen to you in any occupation.