The Seattle Mariners' extra-innings win over the Toronto Blue Jays on Sunday afternoon at Safeco Field was particularly notable for some slick defensive work the M's pulled in the fourth inning.

In a sequence of events involving a handful of players on both sides of the field, Seattle wound up with a 3-6-2-2 triple play - the first time a triple play of that combination has occurred in MLB since August 1955 (according to MLB.com's Greg Johns).

As it's a rather complicated play to describe in words, here's video of the uncommon feat:

More from FoxSports

Toronto's Kevin Pillar, involved in the play on the wrong end, essentially said 'oh well!' when asked about it by Johns: "I just think it's a play that you don't work on a whole lot. It's a play you kind of, in college you would have done a lot, it's almost a designed play to try to trick the guy. Tag the guy who doesn't own the base and then tag the other guy, to see if you can get someone to walk off the base and that's what happened."

Seattle shortstop Brad Miller, meanwhile, didn't quite grasp what had happened until later: "I honestly forgot we had a triple play until after the game when somebody said something. In that time it was crucial. Runners on first and third, no outs, Taijuan came up with a big pitch, and Trumbo made a nice play to get it going."

That's the power of triple plays - they're difficult to explain, difficult to remember (apparently), and pretty uncommon in certain formats. Nicely done, Mariners!

(h/t MLB.com)