Nascar

NASCAR drivers battle visibility issues, adjusting to new rules package at Brickyard

  • Sprint Cup Series driver Jeff Gordon (24) climbs into his car during practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)

    Sprint Cup Series driver Jeff Gordon (24) climbs into his car during practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sprint Cup Series driver Danica Patrick (10) prepares to practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)

    Sprint Cup Series driver Danica Patrick (10) prepares to practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sprint Cup Series driver Kevin Harvick (4) prepares to drive during practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)

    Sprint Cup Series driver Kevin Harvick (4) prepares to drive during practice for the NASCAR Brickyard 400 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, July 24, 2015. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)  (The Associated Press)

A new rules package for Indianapolis Motor Speedway provided visibility issues for drivers on Friday. It was even harder to see after nearly five hours of practice Friday if the new rules package will produce better racing.

NASCAR is trying to improve the on-track product, and is using four track-specific aerodynamic packages to see what could be a better fit for the heavy stock cars. The package used two weeks ago at Kentucky was well-received by the drivers, but NASCAR switched to a high-drag setup for Indianapolis, where passing has always been difficult.

There were mixed opinions after three long practice sessions, and many drivers said anytime they got too close to another car, the turbulence was so rough, they had to back off to avoid crashing.