Sports

Federal appeals court in California reconsiders Barry Bonds' obstruction of justice conviction

  • File - In this Dec. 16, 2011 file photo, former baseball player Barry Bonds leaves federal court after being sentenced for obstructing justice in a government steroids investigation in San Francisco. Nearly 11 years after Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges will hear arguments Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

    File - In this Dec. 16, 2011 file photo, former baseball player Barry Bonds leaves federal court after being sentenced for obstructing justice in a government steroids investigation in San Francisco. Nearly 11 years after Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges will hear arguments Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • File - In this Sept. 6, 2014, file photo, career home run leader Barry Bonds gives a thumbs up while standing behind the batting cage and watching the Houston Astros take batting practice before the start of their baseball game against the Oakland Athletics Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in Oakland, Calif. Nearly 11 years after Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges will hear arguments Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

    File - In this Sept. 6, 2014, file photo, career home run leader Barry Bonds gives a thumbs up while standing behind the batting cage and watching the Houston Astros take batting practice before the start of their baseball game against the Oakland Athletics Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in Oakland, Calif. Nearly 11 years after Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges will hear arguments Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Dennis Riordan, left, attorney for defendant Barry Bonds, argues before an 11-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, in San Francisco. Nearly 11 years after Barry Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges heard arguments on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, Pool)

    Dennis Riordan, left, attorney for defendant Barry Bonds, argues before an 11-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, in San Francisco. Nearly 11 years after Barry Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges heard arguments on whether baseball’s career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Barry Bonds is getting another chance to erase his felony conviction for obstruction of justice.

His lawyer on Thursday urged a special 11-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn the conviction stemming from his 2003 appearance before a grand jury. A jury in 2011 convicted him for giving a rambling answer to a question about whether he received injections from someone other than his doctor.

Bonds' lawyers argue that prosecutors should have asked the question again if they were unsatisfied with the answer.

A three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit upheld the conviction, but the court agreed to reconsider the case and have it decided by the 11-judge panel.