Sports

Hodgson knows England is searching for 'scapegoats,' accepts he's fortunate to be staying

England national soccer team head coach Roy Hodgson touches his face during a press conference after a squad training session that was closed to the media for the 2014 soccer World Cup at the Urca military base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, June 22, 2014.  Costa Rica's surprise 1-0 win over Italy on Friday meant that England made its most humiliating exit from a World Cup since 1958, following consecutive defeats by the Italians and then Uruguay in Group D.  England play Costa Rica in their final Group D match on Tuesday.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

England national soccer team head coach Roy Hodgson touches his face during a press conference after a squad training session that was closed to the media for the 2014 soccer World Cup at the Urca military base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, June 22, 2014. Costa Rica's surprise 1-0 win over Italy on Friday meant that England made its most humiliating exit from a World Cup since 1958, following consecutive defeats by the Italians and then Uruguay in Group D. England play Costa Rica in their final Group D match on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

After England's World Cup fiasco, Roy Hodgson realizes the country is searching for a scapegoat, and accepts he's fortunate to have survived as coach.

Despite England failing to reach the second round, the Football Association wants Hodgson to see out his contract until the 2016 European Championship.

Hodgson says he is "very pleased to have had that (FA) backing. Scapegoats are always necessary in times of failure ... whether it's fortunate that's the position I find myself in, I accept that I'm fortunate."

Despite England opening Group D with two 2-1 losses to Italy and Uruguay, there were glimpses of a potentially promising future for some of Hodgson's younger players.

Before flying home, England must play Costa Rica on Tuesday.