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World Cup Safety 101: Brazil Issues Guide On How To Survive A Mugging During Tourney

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MAY 04:  Military Police officers keep watch after a match between Flamengo and Palmeiras as part of Brasileirao Series A 2014 at Maracana Stadium on May 04, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The legendary stadium was constructed in the heart of Rio de Janeiro ahead of the 1950 FIFA World Cup and at one point seated at least 183,000 people. Considered the temple of Brazilian soccer, where legend Pele scored his 1,000th goal, the stadium received a $600 million makeover for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and will host the final match of the World Cup which starts June 12.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MAY 04: Military Police officers keep watch after a match between Flamengo and Palmeiras as part of Brasileirao Series A 2014 at Maracana Stadium on May 04, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The legendary stadium was constructed in the heart of Rio de Janeiro ahead of the 1950 FIFA World Cup and at one point seated at least 183,000 people. Considered the temple of Brazilian soccer, where legend Pele scored his 1,000th goal, the stadium received a $600 million makeover for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and will host the final match of the World Cup which starts June 12. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

With fewer than 30 days to go, the countdown to the FIFA World Cup is officially picking up steam and Brazilian law enforcement wants to make sure tournament fans are safe.

Brazilian newspaper Estado de Sao Paulo reported that local police plan to distribute a brochure on how to survive the means streets of Rio, the capital and beyond during the monthlong event.

It will include tips on how to avoid being robbed, such as tucking valuable jewelry out of sight, and more importantly how to confront a mugger.

“Do not react, scream or argue,” the guide reportedly will advise tourists and fans. Also "change your route between their destinations and always check if someone is following you."

According to Peruvian newspaper El Comercio, the Brazilian police force has also taken classes in various languages, as more than 600,000 tourists are expected during the soccer feast. The brochure will be published in various languages, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.

In 2013, Brazil has one of the highest homicide rates in the world, with 25 out of every 100,000 people murdered, according to the United Nations. So far, the ministry of Defense has deployed more than 30,000 troops throughout the country and around the tournament grounds leading up to the kickoff on June 12.

At the last World Cup in South Africa, authorities issued similar warnings, but crime actually fell during the tournament, according to reports.

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