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Wind stops play at Women's British Open

After more than five hours of waiting, officials finally called play for the day on Saturday at the Women's British Open.

Play was halted over an hour before leader Na Yeon Choi was set to tee off as high wind was blowing golf balls all over greens.

Nine players managed to complete their third rounds. Cristie Kerr and amateur Lydia Ko both posted 3-over 75s for the best score of those who finished.

Of the 42 players on the course, Anna Nordqvist was having the best round. Nordqvist was 1-under par through 15 holes of her third round on the Old Course at St. Andrews.

Eighteen players had yet to post a score when officials blew the horns to stop play.

The round was halted for the day when the wind refused to die down. Round three will resume on Sunday at 6:15 a.m. local time, with the final round to follow.

Players will remain in the same groups for Sunday's final round, which officials hope to start at 8 a.m. local time. If all goes according to plan, the final group will start their final round at 1:40 p.m. local time, or 8:40 a.m. (ET).

"This is a major championship and every endeavor will be made to finish 72 holes," said Susan Simpson, Ladies Golf Union (LGU) head of golf operations. "So if we need to go to Monday, then we'll go to Monday."

Choi entered the third round with a 1-stroke lead over Miki Saiki. Choi opened with a pair of 67s to reach 10-under for the championship. Saiki fired a 66 in round two to get within one of the lead.

First-round leader Morgan Pressel posted a 2-under 70 in round two and was alone in third as the third round got underway.

All eyes were on world No. 1 Inbee Park, who won the season's first three majors. She has six titles in all this year. Park started the third round eight shots off the lead, but was 1-under par through four holes.

Park joined Nordqvist as the only two players that were in red figures for the day when play was stopped.

If she can rally for the win, Park would become the first golfer, male or female, to win the first four majors in a single season.